War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0257 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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wishes of individual commanders, I will mention the fact that since the capture of Corinth all except one of Major-General Thomas' divisions have been transferred from his immediate command, and even that one is held in reserve, to be assigned to you if circumstances should require it, thus depriving General Thomas of any distinct command whatever. Moreover Major-General Buell is to-day in command of only two divisions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HUNTSVILLE, June 4, 1862.

General BUELL:

An expedition under the command of General Negley, consisting of troops from all the forces under my command, marched from Fayetteville on the morning of the 1st instant. On the 2nd this column entered Winchester, driving thence the enemy's cavalry, under Starnes, and captured a Baptist preacher, who is a ranger, with four of his band. That column is now moving toward Jasper. A supporting column, under Colonel Still, now occupies Stevenson. It is now expected that these two columns will unite before reaching Jasper. We hop that the enemy is ignorant of our strength and will make a stand at Jasper. They were undoubtedly surprised at Winchester, and I think will not expect to be followed into the mountains. I learn, from what I consider reliable authority, that on the 28th ultimo Beauregard telegraphed Leadbetter at Chattanooga to cross the river and hold the northern side, and especially Winchester, at all hazards. Some artillery has already been sent over, and possibly some infantry. I think my force is more than sufficient, even if all the troops under Leadbetter should be found at Jasper. Our entire force of infantry, cavalry, and artillery will hardly fall short of 6,000 men.

There is but one way of ridding the country of guerrilla bands, and that is to turn out against them a sufficient force of cavalry to pursue and utterly destroy them, with orders not to return till the work is ended. I cannot obtain horses; the wagon horses have been inspected and are [of] little value. Can you send me some cavalry?

O. M. MITCHEL,

Major-General, Commanding.

MISSISSIPPI RIVER, ABOVE FORT PILLOW, June 4, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

SIR: When all the engineers of the Queen declined the hazard of the expedition of last evening two young men from my military guard offered to handle the engines and run the boat wherever I wished to take her, and did so coolly and skillfully. I trust that I have not exceeded my authority in detailing R. L. Groomes and W. Jackson, both privates, of Company G, Sixty-third Illinois Regiment, and giving the first the position and pay of chief and the second the position and pay of first assistant engineer, for which they have license. I must have men who will stand by the engines and wheels under all circumstances.

17 R R-VOL X, PT II