War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0245 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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I have ordered General Granger to cross as soon as possible with cavalry regiment and a battery and pursue the enemy to Booneville. Hold your command in readiness, so that as soon as he reports any considerable resistance you can advance to Booneville.

Do not move forward until you hear from him.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

POPE'S HEADQUARTERS, June 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

My advance passed through Booneville this morning this morning at 5 o'clock and are now doubtless near Baldwyn. My command is so disposed that within four hours I can concentrate 40,000 men. I am interposed between the two main bodies of the enemy, retreating on both sides of the Mobile and Ohio road. It was their intention to unite at Baldwyn and use the railroad. No considerable portion of them will be able to do so. I am strong; will be more than a match for him, and I will at once attack. I think it will not be advisable to push the pursuit beyond Baldwyn, because of the difficulty of supplying the command.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General.

JUNE 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Enough to take care of myself and my forces are disposed. If the enemy still attempts to form a junction at Baldwyn, I can easily prevent it and beat him in detail. I have no idea any effort of the kind will be made, but that his forces will scatter still more. I feel satisfied.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS, Near Danville, Miss., June 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Our cavalry under General Granger has come up with the rear guard of the enemy, 5,000 or 6,000 strong, posted on the opposite side of a difficult creek 2 miles this side of Baldwyn. General Rosecrans will be up with him to-night with 15,000 men, and Hamilton will follow closely with 12,000 more. I shall move forward the divisions of Sherman and Davies to Rienzi, to support them, if necessary. As I have informed you, I shall not urge the pursuit beyond Baldwyn, which is the enemy's first large depot, 35 miles from Corinth. General Granger has taken and continues to take a great many prisoners, and one regiment is now in pursuit of a large train, 4 miles west of the railroad, which he reports he will certainly capture.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General.