War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0237 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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and will furnish the necessary working parties and guards. One brigade should be left to-morrow at camp on the railroad about 9 miles from Corinth, which will place it about half way between the first and second burnt bridges, and it can aid in the repair of both. The remainder of the division should continue its march to Bear Creek Bridge and halt there until the work at that point is completed. You should march with five or six days' supplies, or what you now have on hand, if more, and afterward draw from Eastport to you. You will at all times surround yourself by all military precautions against surprise, and will post your command judiciously for defense, intrenching if seriously threatened. It will be best for you to move your camp entire.

Brig. Gen. W. S. Smith is detailed as superintendent of the work, so that your duties will be those only of military commander. You will of course answer promptly General Smith's requisition for fatigue parties, and will, without further detailed instructions, give all orders necessary to accomplish the speediest repair of the railroad and secure the Government interests. The regiment of Michigan Engineers and Mechanics is engaged on the work for fatigue purposes, but everything else connected with the expedition comes of course under your general direction.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY,

Colonel and Chief of Staff.

CAMP NEAR CORINTH, June 1, 1862.

Major-General POPE:

Colonel Elliott's operation was splendid, and he shall be rewarded. Press the enemy as hard as you deem it safe and advisable.

Buell has moved a division toward Iuka, which will protect your flank. Other forces are moving forward to cover your right. If you want any re-enforcements, say so, and you shall have them.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

CAMP NEAR CORINTH, June 1, 1862.

Major-General POPE:

Since the destruction of the railroad by Colonel Elliott at Booneville I think the enemy's retreat is very much embarrassed, and if you press him vigorously to-day you will greatly demoralize his force and capture some prisoners.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, June 1, 1862.

General GRANGER:

As General [A. J.] Smith has gone to Jacinto, there is no occasion for you to go in that direction. You will give every assistance in your