War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0215 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Captain Brown is a good officer, but no one man can properly discharge one-third of the duties which devolve upon him. One additional assistant quartermaster and additional assistant commissary should also be sent to this camp, and the facilities for transportation should be increased at least one-half. We now depend entirely upon Lexington, and at this moment I am prevented from making an important movement from want of six days' supplies. Had the enemy stores a forward movement could be risked, but late intelligence indicates that, with the exception of Cumberland Gap, he is as hard pressed as we are.

GEORGE W. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General Volunteers, Commanding.

ABOVE FORT PILLOW, May 26, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

I arrived at my fleet yesterday, leaving one of my boats at New Albany, ready to follow in twenty-four hours. The others are all here. I visited Commander Davis immediately, to obtain his views and offer co-operation. The commodore intimates unwillingness to assume any risk at this time, but will communicate with me again these batteries and surprise the enemy's fleet and transports before they can escape up the tributaries. To me the risk is greater to lie here with my small guard, and within an hour's march of a strong encampment of the enemy, than to run by the battery and to make the attack. I shall, if necessary, repeat the proposition the moment the Switzerland arrives with the barges I have prepared to shelter the boats. I wish to take advantage of the high water.

Respectfully,

CHAS. ELLET, JR.,

Colonel, Commanding.

CAMP ON CORINTH ROAD, May 27, 1862.

Major-General WILLIAM T. SHERMAN:

What is the condition of affairs on your wing? Enemy's pickets on the center driven to other side of Bridge Creek. Our batteries preparing to open on the enemy. General Pope is of opinion that the movement of troops last night was south. This directly contradicts your report.

Pope's left has advanced to-day to feel the enemy. Please answer.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

MAY 27, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Everything remarkably quiet. Our pickets on our right converse across the Purdy railroad at Modlin's and do not fire on each other.

On our front the number and strength of enemy's pickets increased. I cannot tell what the cars were doing last night. They seemed to come