War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0209 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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There was no enemy, nor had there been anywhere in that region. The country was almost impassable. The command then went to Iuka and returned along the railroad as far as Glendale. At Burnsville a few mounted pickets were seen and pursued for several miles in the direction of Jacinto, where there is a regiment of cavalry, under McNeill, formerly of the "Rifles." The pickets were undoubtedly from that regiment.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 22, 1862.

Major-General O. M. MITCHEL,

Huntsville, Ala.:

You are allowed to inflict the extreme penalty of military law upon persons guilty of the crimes specified in your telegram and upon those guilty of irregular or guerrilla warfare.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HUNTSVILLE, ALA., May 22, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

My position is not well defined. I have requested General Buell to inform [me] under what conditions I am to command the troops under General Negley and others in Tennessee. Your order me report to you directly. Is my command independent, or am I to look for orders from General Buell?

O. M. MITCHELL,

Major-General.

HDQRS. SEVENTH DIVISION, ARMY OF THE OHIO, Cumberland Ford, May 22, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

The following dispatch has just been sent to Major-General Buell:

Reliable scout has just come in. The enemy has withdrawn from Big Creek Gap, and will reach Cumberland Gap to-day. A reliable letter from Clinton also informs me that the roads between Knoxville and Clinton are lined with troops coming this way. It is probable that the enemy is concentrating his entire force in East Tennessee upon my immediate front. The march of to-day will be executed as before ordered, but it may become imprudent to pass the mountains unless a strong diversion be made upon Cleveland or Chattanooga by General Mitchel. Will the interests of the service permit such a diversion to be made?

GEORGE W. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General Volunteers.

CAMP NEAR CORINTH, May 22, 1862-9 a.m.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

General Halleck's army has been greatly reduced by sickness. The enemy are in great force at Corinth, and have recently received re-

14 R R-VOL X, PT II