War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0203 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

road with the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, and routed it, killing 2 of the number.

Since the enemy has been in great commotion, and General Sherman writes that Colonel McDowell informs him that he thinks the enemy contemplate a general attack. I think differently. Nevertheless, you will place and keep your command in readiness to meet any emergency.

Yours, &c.,

JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS RESERVE, ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE, Camp near Corinth, May 19, 1862.

Major-General WILLIAM T. SHERMAN,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: All quiet yet. Make no communication in regard to the reported attack in my line or flank either to General Halleck or to General Grant until further advised by me.

Your obedient servant,

JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE, In Field, near Corinth, May 19, 1862.

Major-General JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Commanding Reserve Corps:

Reconnoiter the movements of the enemy, and if you find that you are to be attacked by a superior force, make the best possible disposition of the forces under your command. If your force is not deemed sufficient, inform me by telegraph, and also inform division commanders nearest you.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS RESERVE CORPS, Army at Locust Hill, May 19, 1862.

Major-General WILLIAM T. SHERMAN,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: It is now half past 2 o'clock p.m., and seems to be credibly reported by my pickets that the enemy are advancing in force upon my right,

Yours, &c.,

JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Major-General, Commanding.

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 19, 1862.

Major-General BUELL,

Headquarters Paducah:

The department has no mounted cavalry at its disposal, but horses