War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0200 Chapter XXII. KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA.

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Enemy strongly resisted advance on the right. General W. T. Sherman reports 44 killed and a large number wounded. Enemy driven back at every point, leaving his killed and wounded on the field.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

FARMINGTON, May 17, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

My command is in position. My left refused with Hamilton en echelon and my batteries in position. I am throwing up breastworks for infantry, and consider myself secure. I regret the delay in this movement, but desire to be acquitted of the fault of any part of it. My whole command was ready to move at 7 a. m., with the heads of the columns on the road. Crittenden is closed upon my right. No resistance was met beyond that of pickets, but the alarm drums have been beating in Corinth for several hours.

My pickets are a full mile toward Corinth.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

May 17, 1862.

Brigadier General E. A. PAINE:

You will move immediately with your division, without tents or baggage, as heretofore directed, and occupy the ground on right of Farmington, pointed out to you by General Granger, who will mark out your line and the intrenchments you are to throw up. You will begin to work upon them as soon as your force is in line and continue the work rapidly. They must be so far completed to-night as to be capable of making a good defense in the morning.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

CAMP ON CORINTH ROAD,

May 18, 1862-9 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Whole army moved to permanent line this morning and breastworks thrown up during the night. Enemy made no resistance to forward movement, except to Major-General Sherman's division, on extreme right. A severe skirmish ensued, lasting several hours. Our loss 44 killed and a number wounded. They were left on the field. Loss of the enemy not yet ascertained, but it has been severe. Picket firing along the front is now quite brisk, and it is possible the enemy may attempt to advance. Did you get my letter referring to Master Thompson's absence and my return? I hope Master Thompson may agree to postpone his visits for a few weeks. I would like to see this work closed before leaving.

THOMAS A. SCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War.