War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0179 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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tucky. His route to Lexington would be through Richmond. I feel confident it is true. He may be en route for Kentucky with a fragment to get his re-enforcements.

G. CLAY SMITH,

Colonel Fourth Regiment.

I have advised the organization of a fore of 250 Home Guards at Lexington and twelve companies to be stationed at various points. I will now advise the organization of two regiments of mounted men. A smaller force would be of on service. Cavalry are necessary to protect my line of communication and to crush guerrilla parties. Teh rebel hatred to the Union is more intense than ever, and one single reverse on our part and the rebels would take the field in force.

I now cover London with Spears' brigade. To further reduce my force would render active operations on my part impossible. Smith's forces are still around Cumberland Gap.

GEORGE W. MORGAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

MONTEREY, May 10, 1862.

Major-General POPE:

I have been through the right and center to General Nelson. Buell moves two divisions to the left. Enemy reconnoitering on the right, apparently in force, evidently disposed to dispute the passage of Seven Mile Creek.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

May 10, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

All quiet in my front. My pickets occupy Farmington, as usual, the grand guards being in the hills beyond the creek. I can cross without difficulty any day.

I had the whole country on my left, as far as the railroad, thoroughly scoured by cavalry to-day. No signs of any enemy or that he had been there recently.

I am making several crossings of the creek at different places and can readily pass it any day you name.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Near Farmington, May 10, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Deserter from Louisiana regiment in skirmish yesterday just in. Rebel force 35,000, under Bragg, Van Dorn, Hardee, and Price, with thirty-five pieces of artillery. Their purpose was to overwhelm my command and pursue to Tennessee River. We are supposed to number 10,000. Their loss was heavy, both in officers and men. Our loss I will report as soon as I can get returns. The country is clear to Farmington and beyond.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.