War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0167 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

May 6, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

General Paine writes that Major Rawalt, Seventh Illinois Cavalry, who is with the advanced pickets, reports that, from all indications now, the rebels are leaving Corinth. I will ascertain the facts as soon as I can.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION,

Numbers 50. Camp Numbers 3, May 6, 1862.

The division will move to the right about 2 miles tomorrow in the present order of encampment. All the ammunition and tools must be taken along. The ammunition of each regiment will follow immediately in the rear; everything else in the division train. Each brigade train will be under the direction of the brigade quartermaster. Those brigades requiring provisions may send one-half of their wagons to the river, provided they can carry everything needful in the other half; such trains will also observe brigade organizations.

The First Brigade will move at 8 a. m.

By order of Brigadier General W. T. Sherman:

J. H. HAMMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAMP TAYLOR,

Huntsville, Ala., May 6, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

No answer has been received to my request for authority to send two or three notorious rebels to a Northern prison. Judge Lane and Senator Clemens believe it necessary. Would it avail anything for General Clemens to appear in Washington as the representative of the citizens of Northern Alabama, his object being to learn unofficially in what way the existing controversy might be ended? He will come if you approve it. Since the driving out of the regular troops, guerrilla warfare has been commenced, and advocated by the very men I wish to send to a Northern prison. The failure to occupy Tuscumbia, I fear, is to become a frighful source of trouble. Morgan is said to have crossed below Florence, and it is now said other cavalry, and even Price's infantry, are now crossing. I have not heard from General Buell or General Halleck in two weeks. No re-enforcements have reached me. If guerrilla warfare is to be waged, I must have a large force of cavalry. Am I to expect soon any addition to my command?

O. M. MITCHEL,

Major-General, Commanding.