War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0164 Chapter XXII. KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA.

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MONTEREY, May 5, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Heavy rains for the last twenty hours. Roads bad. Movement progressing slowly. Enemy still concentrating forces at Corinth. Nomination of Sherman for major-general gives great satisfaction. It was nobly gained upon the field of Shiloh.

THOMAS A. SCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Near Farmington, May 5, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Deserter from enemy's lines just in; says he belongs to Hardee's division, now east of Corinth and quite near intrenchments; says that the troops are going into the works. Thinks they will not hold the whole army, mules and wagons, inside. No big guns mounted south of Memphis and Charleston road, but that intrenchments extend from Mobile and Ohio road round by the east to Memphis and Charleston road west of town. South side of town open.

Hardee's whole division has been laying on its arms in line of battle inside the intrenchments ever since skirmish day before yesterday at Farmington.

I am having a sketch of the ground east and south of Corinth made from his information, which I will send you.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Near Farmington, May 5, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Another deserter just in from Bragg's command confirms everything said to you in my last telegram. Says that Mansfield Lovell is assigned to the defense of the Memphis side of Corinth, and is expected every moment with his forces. Says, as do all the other prisoners, that they are badly fed, and that there is much dissatisfaction in their army.

JNumbers POPE,

Major-General, Commanding.

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION,

Camp No. 5, May 5, 1862.

Our situation from the rain and road has become difficult, and it becomes the duty of every officer and man to anticipate our danger and labor. Every ounce of food and forage must be regarded as precious as diamonds. Roads will be impassable and our bridges swept away. General Halleck and our superior officers will do all they can, but their power is limited by nature. We must do our part in full. Men must at once be limited in bread and meat. All live stock in our lines must be driven in and used, and all grass, wheat, and everything fit for forage