War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0099 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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phis, I can throw a force across the river from that place and threaten Jacksonport by the old military road. I have made all necessary preparations for putting in the field the expeditions to New Mexico and Fort Laramie, and General Sturgis has been directed to have the trains prepared as early as possible. General Denver is assigned to the Indian Territory, and will provide for the defense of the friendly Indians.

As the telegraph line will soon be completed from Nashville to Savannah, I shall be in communication with nearly every important point in the department. Should we take Memphis, I purpose to remove my headquarters to that place as soon as the telegraph line can be extended. In the mean time the office of the adjutant-general of the department will remain in Saint Louis.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General, Commanding.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, April 9, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

I have no instructions to give you. Go ahead, and all success attend you. An order of thanks to you has been issued. Send frequent reports of your operations and full details of recent success.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Saint Louis, April 9, 1862-11 a.m.

General GRANT, Savannah, Tenn.:

Received your dispatch of the 7th about battle at Pittsburg last night. Dispatched a hospital boat early this morning and will have more on the way to-day. Preparations are making at Cincinnati to accommodate some 10,000 sick and wounded.

I leave immediately to join you with considerable re-enforcements. Avoid another battle, if you can, till all arrive. We then shall be able to beat them without fail.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

PITTSBURG, TENN., April 9, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: There is little doubt but that the enemy intend concentrating upon the railroad at and near Corinth all the force possible, leaving many points heretofore guarded entirely without troops. I learn this through Southern papers and from a spy who was in Corinth after the rebel army left.

They have sent steamers up White River to bring down Van Dorn's and Price's commands. They are also bringing forces from the East. Prisoners also confirm this information.

I do not like to suggest, but it appears to me that it would be demoralizing upon our troops here to be forced to retire upon the opposite