War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0043 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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This country is so overflowed that but few roads can be traveled, and all are most impassable for artillery. A few dry days, however, would remedy this, and it is certainly time to look for a change of weather. I shall order all the forces here, except McClernand's division, to Pittsburg, and send back steamers as rapidly as possible.

It is with great difficulty that quartermasters at Paducah and Cairo can be impressed with the magnitude of our wants in coal and forage. We are not short in both these articles. Corn can be procured here for a few days, but not for a long period. I would respectfully suggest to the general commanding the importance of having funds in the hands of the quartermaster to pay the people for such supplies as we get from them.

All the troops of my command, except those left to garrison Forts Henry and Donelson, two regiments at Clarksville yet to arrive, and McClernand's division, will be at Pittsburg. The accompanying report of General Sherman, with the above statement, shows the present distribution of my forces. The Fifty-second Illinois, Colonel T. W. Sweeny, commanding, has just arrived.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE,

Savannah, Tenn., March 17, 1862.

General WILLIAM T. SHERMAN,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Pittsburg, Tenn.:

I have just arrived, and although sick for the last two weeks, begin to feel better at the thought of again being along with the troops. I have ordered all troops here to report to you immediately, except McClernand's division. Among those to report you will find a number of regiments not of my command formerly, and consequently not yet brigades Organize them into brigades, and attach them to divisions as you deem best.

Inclosed is a list* of all such regiments, some of which must be with you already.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General, Commanding.

SAINT LOUIS, March 17, 1862.

General BUELL, Nashville:

Can you not extend telegraph line from Nashville to Mount Pleasant, and thence to Savannah? Do you want any material or workmen for that purpose? How far have your advance guards progressed? It is important that you put yourself in communication with our forces at Savannah as soon as possible. Cannot your cavalry open the road from Mount Pleasant by Waynesborough? The enemy is making a desperate resistance at Island Numbers 10. He has a very large force there, and no time should be lost in cutting it off from Johnston and Memphis. Pope has got complete command of the river below, with twenty five heavy guns in battery. Push forward your troops as rapidly as possible, so that we can cut their railroad communication.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

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*Not found.

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