War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0033 Chapter XXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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When you go up the river to assume the general command direct the officer at Fort Henry to report all troops that pass. Inform me as early as possible where General Smith has landed. Some of the pontoon boats at Paducah should be towed up the Tennessee for depot of commissary stores.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

FORT HENRY, March 13, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Saint Louis, Mo.:

Just arrived, and ordered to proceed up the Tennessee River, and there report to Major-General Smith, commanding expedition; Thirteenth Iowa, effective strength 848; Fifth Ohio Battery, effective strength 149, with four 6-pounder rifled and two 6-pounder rifled guns and two 12-pounder howitzers, effective strength 140. I also have learned unofficially that the Twentieth Ohio, sent from Fort Donelson as an escort to prisoners, proceeded up the Tennessee. They did not as an escort to prisoners, proceeded up the Tennessee. They did not report to me. I suppose their orders were to report to General Smith.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Saint Louis, March 13, 1862.

Major-General BUELL,

Nashville, Tenn.:

The new arrangement of departments* will not interfere with your command. You will continue in command of the same army and district of country as heretofore, so far as I am concerned. In order to have perfect co-operation, please to inform me at your earliest convenience the strength and position (in general terms) of your command; also what you know about the strength and position of the enemy. I hope to be able to meet you for consultation at some point early next week. Curtis' victory in Arkansas has relieved me of much anxiety.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

NASHVILLE, TENN., March 13, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Your dispatch received. I will write at length in regard to the force under my command. All information goes to show that the enemy is concentrating along the Memphis and Charleston Railroad at the great southern bend of the Tennessee. Decatur seems to be the main point, but they also occupy Huntsville, Corinth, and several intermediate points, besides Jackson and Humboldt. The movements going on make it difficult to estimate their strength at any point. There is no doubt that considerable re-enforcements are coming up from the South. The Southern papers announce that Pensacola has been almost evacu-

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*See the President's War Order, Numbers 3., of March 11, p. 28.

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3 R R-VOL X, PT II