War of the Rebellion: Serial 011 Page 0024 KY., TENN., N. MISS., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXII.

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ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION,

Numbers 1.

Paducah, March 9, 1862.

The organization of brigades at Paducah will remain substantially the same on the present expedition, viz:

First Brigade, Colonel Hicks commanding:

Fortieth Illinois Volunteers, Colonel S. G. Hicks.

Forty-sixth Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Worthington.

Morton's Indiana Battery.

Second Brigade, Colonel Stuart commanding:

Fifty-fifth Illinois Volunteers, Colonel D. Stuart.

Seventy-first Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Mason.

Fifty-fourth Ohio Volunteers, Colonel T. K. Smith.

Third Brigade, Colonel Hildebrand commanding:

Seventy-seventh Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Hildebrand.

Fifty-seventh Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Mungen.

Fifty-third Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Appler.

Fourth Brigade, Colonel Buckland commanding:

Seventy-second Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Buckland.

Forty-eighth Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Sullivan.

Seventieth Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Cockerill.

The Fifth Ohio Cavalry will not be brigaded.

Morning field reports will be required daily from each brigade, and, if possible, before 10 a.m.

The several brigades will move on boats in the order of rank as above, and the boats of each brigade will move together.

By order of Brigadier General W. T. Sherman, commanding First Division:

J. H. HAMMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SAINT LOUIS, March 10, 1862-9 a.m.

Major-General McCLELLAN, Washington:

Telegram of 9th, just received gives General Grant's forces 35,000 infantry, 3,000 cavalry, and fifty-four pieces of artillery. General Pope has made a lodgment below Point Pleasant, thus turning Island Numbers 10. Unless stronger than supposed, it cannot hold out a long time.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, March 10, 1862-7 p.m.

Major-General McCLELLAN, Washington:

Reserves intended to support General Curtis will now be drawn in as rapidly as possible and sent to the Tennessee. I propose going there in a few days. That is now the great strategic line of the Western campaign, and I am surprised that General Buell should hesitate to re-enforce me. He was too late at Fort Donelson, as Hunter has been in Arkansas. I am obliged to make my calculations independent of both. Believe me, general, you make a serious mistake in having three independent commands in the West. There never will and never can be any co-operation at the critical moment; all military history proves it. You will regret your decision against me on this point. Your friendship for individuals has influenced your judgment. Be it so. I