War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0911 Chapter XXII. NAVAL ENGAGEMENT OFF MEMPHIS, TENN.

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To which the mayor replies:

MAYOR'S OFFICE, Memphis, June 6, 1826.

C. H. DAVIS, Flag-Officer,

Commanding, &c.:

SIR: Your note of this day is received and contents noted.

In reply, I have only to say that as the civil authorities have no means of defense, by the force of circumstances the city is in your hands.

Respectfully,

JNumbers PARK,

Mayor.

Subsequently the following correspondence took place:

U. S. FLAG-STEAMER BENTON,

Off Memphis, June 6, 1862.

To His Honor the MAYOR OF THE CITY OF MEMPHIS:

SIR: The undersigned, commanding the military and naval forces in front of Memphis, have the honor to say to the mayor of the city, that Colonel Fitch, commanding the Indiana Brigade, will take military possession of the city immediately.

Colonel Fitch will be happy to receive the co-operation of his honor the mayor and the city authorities in maintaining peace and order, and to this end he will be pleased to confer with his honor at the military headquarters at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

The undersigned have the honor to be, with high respect, your most obedient servant,

C. H. DAVIS,

Flag-Officer, Commanding Afloat.

G. N. FITCH,

Colonel, Commanding Indiana Brigade.

MAYOR'S OFFICE, June 6, 1862.

To Flag-Officer C. H. DAVIS and Col. G. N. FITCH.

SIRS: Your communication is received, and I shall be happy to co-operate with the colonel commanding in providing measures for maintaining peace and order in the city.

Your most obedient servant,

JNO. PARK,

Mayor.

In accordance with the above, the mayor and common council called upon me at 3 o'clock p.m., and by mutual arrangement it was agreed that the municipal functions should continue, and the military to be used whenever and wherever necessary to aid the enforcement of the proper ordinances for the preservation of peace and protection of life and property and the maintenance of the supremacy of the laws and Constitution of the United States.

In addition to the threatening attitude of the mob, there is known to be a considerable body of cavalry 15 or 20 miles in the rear of the city, threatening a descent upon it.

In view of these facts, cannot a small re-enforcement, including a squadron of cavalry and a battery, be sent to this place?

G. N. FITCH,

Colonel, Commanding.

Major-General JOHN POPE.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

No.-. Henry Von Phul, June 6, 1862.

The company commanders will immediately see that their several companies are assembled at some particular of the boat, which will be known as their quarters, where they will stack arms and deposit knapsacks, and be in readiness to take both at a moment's notice or