War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0910 KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXII.

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was informed that a white flag had been raised in the city. I immediately sent my son, Medical Cadet Charles R. Ellet, ashore with a flag of truce and the following note to the authorities:

OPPOSITE MEMPHIS, June 6, 1862.

To the Civil or Military Authorities of Memphis:

GENTLEMAN: I understand that the city of Memphis has surrendered. I therefore send my son, with two United States flags, with instructions to raise one upon the custom-house and the other upon the court-house, as evidence of the return of your city to the care and protection of the Constitution.

CHAS. ELLET, JR.,

Colonel, Commanding.

The bearer of the flags and the above note was accompanied by Lieutenant Crandall, of the Fifty-ninth Illinois Regiment, and 2 men of the boat guard. The following is the reply of the mayor of the city:

MAYOR'S OFFICE, Memphis, Tenn., June 6, 1862.

Col. CHARLES ELLET, JR.,

Commanding, &c.:

SIR: Your note of this date is received and contents noted. The civil authorities of this city are not advised of its surrender to the forces of the United States Government, and our reply to you is simply to state respectfully that we have no forces to oppose the raising of the flags you have directed to be raised over the custom-house and post-office.

Respectfully,

JNumbers PARK,

Mayor.

On receiving this reply the small party proceeded to the post-office to raise the national flag, and were there joined by the mayor. It is proper to say that the conduct of the mayor and some of the citizens was unexceptionable, but the party was surrounded by an excited crowd, using angry and threatening language. They ascended to the top of the post-office and planted the flag, though fired upon several times and stoned by the mob below. Still, I believe that this conduct was reprobated by the people of standing in the place. Indeed, many evidences reach me of an extensive Union sentiment at Memphis.

Respectfully,

CHAS. ELLET, JR.,

Colonel, Commanding Ram Fleet.

Hon. E. M. STANTON.

HEADQUARTERS INDIANA BRIGADE, Memphis, June 7, 1862.

GENERAL: A strong force patrolled the city last night, the populace having evinced a hostile disposition during the day and threatened to destroy certain public and private property.

The amount of the former is not yet known, but must be very considerable, including commissary stores, hospital furniture, and transports and ordnance.

On my arrival I was informed by Flag-Officer Davis that the following correspondence had taken place between himself and the mayor of the city:

U. S. FLAG-STEAMER BENTON,

Off Memphis, June 6, 1862.

To His Honor the MAYOR OF THE CITY OF MEMPHIS:

SIR: I have respectfully to request that you will surrender the city of Memphis to the authority of the United States, which I have the honor to represent.

I am, Mr. Mayor, with high respect, your most obedient servant,

C. H. DAVIS,

Flag-Officer, Commanding, &c.