War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0878 KY.,TENN.,N.MISS.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXII.

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possibly pass in any considerable force without my knowledge. I trust my plans will meet your approbation.

Colonel Lytle, in command at Bridgeport, reports that a detachment of his troops crossed from the island to the main shore on yesterday, penetrated 12 miles in the direction of Chattanooga without meeting an enemy, captured 2 car loads of Southern mail, and returned in safety to Bridgeport. He reports but two regiments at Chattanooga, and these new troops, and says the report is current among the citizens on that side of the river that New Orleans has been captured.

Since writing the above I have intelligence, through officers now prisoners in our hands, taken at Bridgeport, which I deem it my duty to communicate. They say that New Orleans is abandoned,and that the entire force of the enemy from that region will be sent forward to Corinth, and that a heavy force will be thrown across the river without a train, to be subsisted in the country, with the view to compel our abandonment of Northern Alabama. I do not know how much importance you may attach to this statement.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. M. MITCHELL,

Major-General, Commanding Third Division.

Major-General D. C. BUELL,

Pittsburg Landing, Tenn.

No. 2 Reports of Colonel J. S. Scott, First Louisiana Cavalry.

ATHENS, ALA., May 1, 1862.

GENERAL: I attached the enemy this morning at this place and drove them within 6 miles of Huntsville. They left their tents standing, a considerable quantity of their commissary stores, all camp equipage, and about 150 stand of arms; also some ammunition. They numbered eleven companies. General Mitchel was present, but made his escape by cars. My force was 112 mounted men and my mountain-howitzer battery. My boys took few prisoners, their shots proving singularly fatal.

My loss, I regret to say, was 1 man killed, from Company C, and 3 severely wounded. The enemy's loss must have been 200 killed and wounded.

My officers and men behaved so well that I can make no particular mention.

Yours, very respectfully,

J. S. SCOTT,

Colonel First Regiment Louisiana Cavalry.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD.

P. S.-I cannot, however, close without particular mention of the gallantry of Captain Leake, commanding Company C, and Lieutenant W. H. Holmes, commanding howitzer battery.

[Indorsement.]

The two officers therein named, besides Colonel Scott, shall be mentioned