War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0821 Chapter XXII. SIEGE OF CORINTH, MISS.

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for about a mile, but without overtaking. I was then ordered to fall back on Farmington.

It is proper to remark that the Nineteenth Louisiana was not engaged, by reason of being in the trenches.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. GOBER,

Major, Commanding Second Brigade, Ruggles' Division.

Captain ROY MASON HOOE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

No. 58 Report of Captain W. E. Walker, Sixteenth Louisiana Infantry, of engagement at Farmington, Miss., May 9.

CAMP NEAR CORINTH, MISS., May 11, 1862.

In the battle of Farmington, on the 9th instant, the Sixteenth Regiment Louisiana Volunteers formed the right of the Second Brigade, commanded by Major Daniel Gober, Ruggles' division. Line of battle having been formed at Farmington, it was directed to move forward beyond a field to our front, in order to occupy the woods, in possession of the enemy. Arriving near the point, a brisk fire was opened on us but their position. Having crossed the ridge of woods referred to, the firing of the enemy upon us was resumed with such effect as to occasion temporary derangement of our line. Order having been restored, we again advanced in line of battle across the adjacent fields in pursuit of the enemy, then retiring, but, unable to overtake them, we were ordered to return to the encampment at Corinth.

Respectfully submitted.

W. E. WALKER,

Captain, Commanding Sixteenth Regiment Louisiana Vols.

Captain ROY MASON HOOE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

No. 59. Report of Captain E. Camille Mire, Eighteenth Louisiana Infantry, of engagement at Farmington, Miss., May 9.

HDQRS. EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT LOUISIANA VOLS.,

Near Corinth, Miss., May 10, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to report, in pursuance of orders, Lieutenant. Col.

A. Roman's regiment, Eighteenth Louisiana Volunteers, of which I am in temporary command, took up its line of march to the front at 8 a.m. 9th instant with the Second Brigade, Major Gober commanding.

My command did not meet with the enemy until about 1 p.m. This was in a wood beyond Farmington, near the bottom of Seven Mile Creek and near---house, afterward used as a hospital. While halted in line of battle, with my left resting about 50 yards from this wood, I was ordered to march by the left flank into this wood, after