War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0705 Chapter XXII. SIEGE OF CORINTH,MISS.

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16th we passed through Tuscumbia and reached our present camp on the Tennessee, 2 miles below Florence.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

H. P. VAN CLEVE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Fourteenth Brigade.

Capt. LYNE STARLING,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifth Division.

No. 19 Report of Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Wood, U. S. Army, commanding Sixth Division of operations from April 29 to May 30.

HEADQUARTERS SIXTH DIVISION, ARMY OF THE OHIO, Camp, Tuscumbia, Ala., June 14, 1862.

SIR: After having bivouacked two weeks on the famous field of Shiloh, with every variety of discomfort that absence of its baggage and transportation in the most inclement weather could produce, my division took its position in the line established in orders from the headquarters Department of the Mississippi, directing the Army of the Tennessee to rest its right flank on Owl Creek, and the Army of the Ohio its left on Lick Creek, with its right flank resting on the Fifth (General Crittenden's) Division, its left en echelon in advance of the Fourth (General Nelson's) Division,and its front on what is known in local parlance as the Bark road.

The division remained in this position till April 29. It then moved forward to Lick Creek, a distance of some 3 1/2 miles. During the halt in this camp the division constructed the greater part of the corduroy road through the swampy bottom of Lick Creek. Heavy details were employed on this work for three days. Over this road the headquarters Army of the Ohio and the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Divisions and reserve artillery of this army advanced beyond Lick Creek.

My division crossed the creek on May 3, and falling into the main road leading from Hamburg to Corinth, encamped on this road near the church of Mount Olivet.

On the succeeding day (4th) General Hascall's brigade (Fifth) made a reconnaissance several miles in advance of our position, following the new Farmington road.

On the 5th this brigade was detailed as a working party to repair the main road, on which the division was encamped, and continued on this duty for twenty-four hours. I was relieved by General Garfield's brigade, whose tour of duty lasted a like term. The brigades were attended during tours of road-making by a section of artillery and a squadron of Zahm's (Third Ohio) cavalry.

While engaged in repairing the road General Garfield's brigade had a rencounter with the enemy on the 6th, in which an interchange of the fire of small-arms and shells took place, without, however, casualty on our part. Three of the enemy were captured, but whether he suffered any other casualty I have no information.

On the 7th the division advanced and occupied a position behind Chambers Creek, up to which point the road had already been rendered practicable by its labor. In this connection I will remark that the necessity for repairing the roads, which involved much labor, was

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