War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0691 Chapter XXII. SIEGE OF CORINTH, MISS.

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On the morning of May 2 my regiment broke up camp and marched with the division in a southeast direction on the road leading toward Corinth the distance of 12 miles.

On the morning of the 3rd the Nineteenth Brigade was ordered out to protect workmen upon the road, the Forty-first Regiment acting as a reserve. The advance guard proceeded to within 5 miles of Corinth. Nothing of importance occurred. We returned to camp in the evening.

Heavy firing was heard upon our left in General Pope's army same evening.

May 4 nothing unusual occurred. In the evening received orders to be in readiness to march at daylight.

My 5 the division made an advance a short distance, but returned to camp in consequence of the bad state of the roads.

May 6 all was quiet.

My 7 the division made an advance of 3 1/2 miles and my regiment went out upon picket duty a mile farther in advance.

May 8 the division made an advance of 2 1/2 miles, but returned to camp at midnight.

May 9, heavy cannonading being heard upon our left, my regiment was out at 4 o'clock and moved with the division in the direction of the firing; proceeded but a short distance, then returned to the point from which we retired at midnight the night previous.

May 10 we established our camp.

May 11, 12, and 13 the regiment remained in camp.

May 14 my regiment was on picket duty for twenty-four hours, but saw or heard nothing of importance.

May 15 and 16 regiment remained at camp.

May 17 my regiment was called to arms at 4 p. m., and with the division made an advance to within 2 miles of Corinth.

May 19 the regiment was ordered on picket duty at 3.30 a. m. Quite a brisk skirmish was had with the enemy. One enlisted man, George D. Barnes, Company A, was slightly wounded. We were protecting the regiments building the first parallel of trenches. The enemy fired upon us with his artillery, but my regiment suffered no loss in consequence.

May 20 the regiment was ordered to guard the trenches for twenty-four hours.

In the mornings of May 21, 22, and 23 the regiment stood at arms, but remained in camp.

May 24 the regiment was ordered to guard the trenches for twenty-four hours.

In the mornings of May 21, 22, and 23 the regiment stood at arms, but remained encamp.

May 24 the regiment was ordered to guard the trenches for twenty-four hours.

May 28 the regiment was again ordered to the trenches for duty, but advanced with the division to within a mile of the enemy's works, where we remained until the evening of May 30, when the regiment advanced with the division and took possession of Corinth.

May 31 the regiment performed guard duty in the second parallel of trenches for twenty-four hours.

June 2 the regiment moved with the division into Corinth, occupying the extreme front, and remained one day.

June 4 my regiment marched with the division the distance of 12 miles on the road leading to Booneville.

June 6 the regiment marched with the division 6 miles farther.

June 7 the regiment marched to within 4 miles of Booneville.

June 9, 10, and 11 my regiment was upon the march to the present camp near Iuka.

June 13 the regiment was ordered to move to the bridge on the rail