War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0671 Chapter XXII. SIEGE OF CORINTH, MISS.

Search Civil War Official Records

make his movement slow. Moreover, until the railroad is repaired, it will require almost the entire transportation of the army to supply him; nevertheless it is absolutely necessary to re-enforce General Curtis. I hope the Navy will assist me in supplying him by White River. I am pushing forward troops and opening the road to Memphis.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON.

CORINTH, June 9, 1862.

General Pope has followed the enemy to Guntown, about 40 miles by railroad and 50 by wagon road south of this place. The main body of the rebels has retreated to Okolona. The country south is very swampy; the bridges have been destroyed and the roads blocked up with fallen timber. I do not purpose to pursue him any farther, but to send all forces not required to hold the Memphis and Charleston Railroad to the relief of Curtis in Arkansas and to East Tennessee, if this plan meets the approval of the War Department.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WASHINGTON, June 9, 1862.

Your dispatch of this date has just been received, and your proposed plan of operations is cordially approved. I suppose you contemplate the occupation of Vicksburg and clearing out the Mississippi to New Orleans. If it should in any contingency become necessary, can you lend a hand to Butler?

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

Major-General HALLECK, Corinth.

CORINTH, MISS., July 3, 1862.

In accordance with your instructions, I telegraph to you daily what information I receive of events in this department, stating whether official or unofficial, and, if official, giving the authority. I am not responsible for the truth of the statements thus communicated. I have seen a published statement of General Beauregard that my telegram respecting the capture of locomotives, prisoners, and arms contained as many lies as lines. The number of locomotives captured was reported to be nine, and I so telegraphed you. General Beauregard says only seven. It turns out on a full investigation that we captured eleven. In regard to the number of prisoners and arms taken I telegraphed the exact language of General Pope. If it was erroneous, the responsibility is his, not mine.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.