War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0665 Chapter XXII. SIEGE OF CORINTH, MISS.

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PITTSBURG LANDING, May 2, 1862-11 a. m.

The backwater of the Tennessee River from the flood has destroyed many of our bridges and overflowed the low lands and the creeks in our front. We have but few pontoons and no engineer troops. This greatly embarrasses our movement, as we cannot supply the army on the way. The river has begun to fall to-day, and we hope to move soon. We expect a terrible battle, but our men will fight well, and all are determined to have a victory. The new organization of the army is producing good results and is generally satisfactory. Reports of the battle of the 6th and 7th [ultimo] are received and copies forwarded as rapidly as possible. The newspaper accounts that our divisions were surprised are utterly false. Every division had notice of the enemy's approach hours before the battle commenced.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

PITTSBURG LANDING, May 3, 1862.

(Received in Washington, D. C., May 3, 1862-2 p. m.)

I leave here tomorrow morning, and our army will be before Corinth tomorrow night. There may be no telegraphic communication for the next two or three days.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

MONTEREY, May 6, 1862.

The heavy rains of the 4th and 5th have destroyed some of our bridges and greatly injured the roads. We are rapidly repairing them. Our advance guards are within 6 miles of Corinth. Deserters report that Beauregard has received large re-enforcements from New Orleans, South Carolina, and Georgia, and is very confident of being able to repulse any attack we may make. This country is almost a wilderness and very difficult to operate in.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON.

FIVE MILES FROM CORINTH,

Midnight, May 7, 1862.

A few days ago Lieutenant-Colonel Adams was captured by the enemy near this place. To-day a flag of truce was sent forward to effect his exchange. The advanced forces of the enemy, under Hardee, are 2 miles outside of the defenses at Corinth. The evidences are strong that the enemy are in force at Corinth. Pope's whole army will move forward in the morning to drive the enemy within his works.

A severe battle will probably be fought.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.