War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0403 Chapter XXII. PITTSBURG LANDING, OR SHILOH, TENN.

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manders, but in the excitement I failed to note the hour of their delivery, and therefore omit any notice of them.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

J. THOMPSON,

Aide-de-Camp.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD.

Numbers 139. Report of Colonel William Preston, Aide-de-Camp to General Johnston.

CORINTH, MISS., April 20, 1862.

GENERAL: This morning you requested me to give you such information as I possess in relation to the events which occurred at the battle of Shiloh before the death of the commander, General Johnston.

CORINTH, MISS., April 20, 1862.

GENERAL: This morning you requested me to give you such information as I possess in relation to the events which occurred at the battle of Shiloh before the death of the commander, General Johnston.

The general having determined to attack the enemy, near Pittsburg, on the Tennessee River, moved the forces under his command through Monterey and by a farm-house called Mickey's in the direction of a little country chapel called Shiloh, in the vicinity of which they were encamped. On the morning of the 5th of April the rains were excessive, so that the movement was greatly retarded, but on the afternoon of the same day our advance was within 3 miles of the enemy, who evidently did not suspect that we were in force in the neighborhood.

Strong reasons demanded an immediate attack, as delay increased the danger of discovery, but the exhaustion of the men and the hour of arrival required it to be deferred till the following morning. Men and officers bivouacked for the night.

The morning of the 6th of April was remarkably and beautiful. The country towards Shiloh was wooded, with small fields interspersed, and with bold undulations from the hills bounding the river. The troops moved in two parallel lines, with the brigades under General Breckinridge arranged on either side of the wood as a reserve.

Between dawn and sunrise sharp skirmishing was heard rather more than half a mile in advance in the forest. General Johnston rode forward when we found the action commenced by General Hindman's brigade, which was suffering under a heavy fire. There were many dead and wounded, and some stragglers breaking ranks, whom General Johnston rallied in person. I rode forward, and found General Hindman rallying and animating his men, who were advancing towards the camp. General Johnston then, through me, ordered General Bragg, who was half a mile in the rear, to advance, but it had been anticipated, and the order, having been given by Captain Wickliffe ten minutes before, was being executed. Our forces then entered the enemy's camp under a heavy fire of musketry and artillery.

Passing to the left, General Johnston reconnoitered, from two cabins at the edge of a large field of about 150 acres, the position of the enemy in front. This field extended toward the river and beyond was fringed with a woodland, and 200 or 300 yards beyond was the enemy's camp. Through this field General Cleburne's brigade moved in fine order, with loud and inspiring cheers, to attack the camp. The surprise was complete. It was carried between 7 and 8 o'clock, and its colors, arms, stores, and ammunition were abandoned. The breakfasts of the men were on the table, the officers' baggage and apparel left if the tents, and every evidence remained of unexpected conflict and sudden rout'