War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0397 Chapter XXII. PITTSBURG LANDING, OR SHILOH, TENN.

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your wives, your sisters, and our children on the result. Remember the fair, broad, abounding land, the happy homes, and ties that will be desolated by your defeat. The eyes and hopes of 8,000,000 of people rest upon you. You are expected to show yourselves worthy of your valor and lineage; worthy of the women of the South, whose noble devotion in this war has never been exceeded in any time. With such incentives to brave deeds and with the trust that God is with us your generals will lead you confidently to the combat, assured of success.

A. S. JOHNSTON,

General, Commanding.

[Addenda B.]

Memorandum of the commanders of the corps and of the reserve.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Corinth, April 3, 1862.

1. As soon as the reserve shall have taken position at Monterey a strong working party will be sent to repair the bridges, causeway, and road across Lick Creek, on the direct road from Monterey to Pittsburg, so that it may be used in any forward movement of the reserve.

2. In the approaching battle every effort should be made to turn the left flank of the enemy so as to cut off his line of retreat to the Tennessee River and throw him back on Owl Creek, where he will be obliged to surrender. Every precaution must also be taken on our part to prevent unnecessary exposure of our men to the enemy's gunboats.

By command of General A. S. Johnston:

THOMAS JORDAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Addenda C.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Corinth, Miss., April 16, 1862.

Soldiers of the Army of the Mississippi:

You have bravely fought the invaders of your soil for two days in his own position. Fought your superior in numbers, in arms, in all the appliances of war. Your success has been signal. His losses have been immense, outnumbering yours in all save the personal worth of the slain. You drove him from his camps to the shelter of his iron-clad gunboats, which alone saved him from complete disaster. You captured his artillery, more than 25 flags and standards, and took over 3,000 prisoners.

You have done your duty. Your commanding general thanks you. Your countrymen are proud of your deeds on the bloody field of Shiloh; confident in the ultimate results of your valor.

Soldiers, untoward events saved the enemy from annihilation. His insolent presence still pollutes your soil, his hostile flag still flaunts before you. There can be no peace so long as these things are.

Trusting that God is with us, as with our fathers, let us seek to be worthy of His favor, and resolve to be independent or perish in the struggle.

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.