War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0237 Chapter XXII. PITTSBURG LANDING, OR SHILOH, TENN.

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Officers Non- Privates Total

commissio

ned

officers

Killed 2 3 15 20

Wounded 9 15 80 104

Missing --- --- 7 7

Total 11 18 102 131

With assurances of regard to general commanding brigade, I am, captain, yours, respectfully,

CHARLES CRUFT,

Colonel Thirty-first Indiana Volunteers.

Captain H. SCOFIELD,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General Third Brigade, Fourth Division.

Numbers 58. Report of Lieutenant Colonel John Osborn, Thirty-first Indiana Infantry.

HDQRS. THIRTY-FIRST INDIANA VOLUNTEERS,

Pittsburg Landing, April 8, 1862.

COLONEL: I beg leave to report to you the action of our regiment during Monday, 7th instant, in the battle at this place, while, owing to your wounds, it was under my command. The regiment remained at the place where you bivouacked it during Sunday night and until about 11 o'clock a.m. on Monday. At this time it was ordered out with the brigade to engage in the general fight which had again commenced. We were conducted over toward the creek on the right of our lines, and some distance along it, over broken ground and through the woods, to a point near the right of our front. Here the regiment was placed in position. In a short time the enemy appeared, and we became hotly engaged. The attack was fiercely made and bravely resisted by our men. After some minutes' severe fighting the enemy were forced to give way, and, an assault being ordered upon his lines, the men sprang forward in eager pursuit. They were driven for near a mile, when our line was ordered to halt. The enemy soon wholly disappeared from our front. After holding the ground for some time it was ascertained that the enemy's retreat had become general,and we were ordered to return to camp.

It affords me great pleasure to report to you, colonel, that the officers and men of your regiment acted wit their accustomed gallantry while under my command. Their conduct was as brave as on the day previous, when you led them in person. Every officer and soldier, without one single exception, acted courageously and properly. I am much indebted to the commanders of companies for their noble conduct during the day. While we all deplore the casualty which kept you from the field, each strove so to act as to insure you a good report of his conduct.

Hoping that you may soon recover from the wounds you received in