War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0111 Chapter XXII. PITTSBURG LANDING, OR SHILOH, TENN.

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A flag of truce was sent on to-day from General Beauregard. I inclose herewith a copy of the correspondence.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General, Commanding.

Captain N. H. McLEAN, A. A. G., Dept. of the Miss., Saint Louis, Mo.

[Inclosures.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Monterey, April 8, 1862.

SIR: At the close of the conflict of yesterday, my forces being exhausted by the extraordinary length of time during which they were engaged with yours on that and the preceding day, and it being apparent that you had received and were still receiving re-enforcements, I felt it my duty to withdraw my troops from the immediate scene of conflict.

Under these circumstances, in accordance with usages of war, I shall transmit this under a flag of truce, to ask permission to send a mounted party to the battle-field of Shiloh for the purpose of giving decent interment to my dead.

Certain gentlemen wishing to avail themselves of this opportunity to remove the remains of their sons and friends, I must request for them the privilege of accompanying the burial party, and in this connection I deem it proper to say I am asking only what I have extended to your own countrymen under similar circumstances.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,

General, Commanding.

Major General U. S. GRANT, U. S. A.,

Commanding U. S. Forces near Pittsburg, Tenn.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD,

Pittsburg, April 9, 1862.

Your dispatch of yesterday is just received. Owing to the warmth of the weather I deemed it advisable to have all the dead of both parties buried immediately. Heavy details were made for this purpose, and now it is accomplished. There cannot, therefore, be any necessity of admitting within our lines the parties you desire to send on the ground asked.

I shall always be glad to extend any courtesy consistent with duty,and especially so when dictated by humanity.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General, Commanding.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD,

Comdg. Confederate Army of the Mississippi, Monterey, Tenn.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE,

Numbers 34.

Pittsburg, April 8, 1862.

The general commanding congratulates the troops who so gallantly maintained, repulsed, and routed a numerically superior force of the enemy, composed of the flower of the Southern Army, commanded by their ablest generals, and fought by them with all the desperation of despair.

In numbers engaged, no such contest ever took place on this conti-