War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0099 Chapter XXII. PITTSBURG LANDING, OR SHILOH, TENN.

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and whether any neglect or misconduct of General Grant or any other officer contributed to the sad casualties that befell our forces on Sunday.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

Major-General HALLECK,

Pittsburg Landing.

PITTSBURG LANDING, April 24, 1862.

The sad casualties of Sunday, the 6th, were due in part to the bad conduct of officers who were utterly unfit for their places, and in part to the numbers and bravery of the enemy. I prefer to express no opinion in regard to the misconduct of individuals till I receive the reports of commanders of divisions. A great battle cannot be fought or a victory gained without many casualties. In this instance the enemy suffered more than we did.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON.

PITTSBURG LANDING, May 2, 1862.

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Reports of the battle of the 6th and 7th are received, and copies forwarded as rapidly as possible. The newspaper accounts that our divisions were surprised are utterly false. Every division had notice of the enemy's approach hours before the battle commenced.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

Honorable E. M. STANTON.

CORINTH, MISS., June 15, 1862.

SIR: I transmit herewith a topographical map* of the plain of Shiloh, showing the various positions occupied by our troops between Shiloh Church and Pittsburg Landing in the battle of April 6 and 7 last. This map had been made from careful surveys, and the positions of the various divisions are designated in the precise places which they occupied on the ground at the times indicated. It will enable the reader to understand the official reports of the battle which have already been forwarded to the War Department.

It is not my object in this communication to offer any comments on the battle, beyond the remark that the impression which at one time seemed to have been received by the Department that our forces were surprised in the morning of the 6th is entirely erroneous. I am satisfied from a patient and careful inquiry and investigation that all our troops were notified of the enemy's approach some time before the battle commenced.

Again, our loss was overstated in the official reports, very many of those reported missing having subsequently reported for duty. The number taken prisoners by the enemy was also greatly exaggerated. There seems to have been a morbid desire on the part of some of our

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*To appear in Atlas.

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