War of the Rebellion: Serial 010 Page 0015 Chapter XXII. EXPEDITION TOWARD PURDY, TENN.

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No. 7. Report of Colonel Alfred Mouton, Eighteenth Louisiana Infantry.

HDQRS. 4TH BRIGADE, 1ST CORPS, 2nd GRAND DIV., ARMY OF MISSISSIPPI VALLEY,

Near Corinth, nine miles towards Pittsburg, March 12, 1862.

SIR: A mounted courier has just reached me with a verbal message from Major Baskerville, starting that the enemy had landed a force at Crump's Landing 18,000 strong, firing upon the cavalry pickets, driving them in. The same courier informs me that a regiment of infantry, a company of our artillery, and all the cavalry are retreating on Purdy.

Yours, respectfully,

ALFR. MOUTON,

Colonel Eighteenth Regiment Louisiana Vols.,

Comd. Fourth Brig., C. S. Forces, Mississippi Valley.

Captain ROY MASON HOOE,

A. A. G., Corinth, Miss.

No. 8. Reports of Major-General Baskerville, Second Mississippi Cavalry (Battalion).

HEADQUARTERS, Purdy, March 10, 1862.

SIR: Day before yesterday (March 8) the Yankee transport Golden State arrived at Savannah loaded with troops, followed by a gunboat (name unknown) mounting nine guns.

On the evening of the same day the transport John Adams also landed troops at the same place. She had horses on board, whether draught or cavalry we could not tell. We are, however, informed by a gentleman who had the temerity to visit Savannah that they are draught horses. The gunboat mentioned above returned to Savannah again yesterday, having on board several tories, taken from Chalk Bluff, among whom may be mentioned the following: Colonel A. M. Craven, Thomas Orr, Ned Towry, and Benton Towry.

Another gunboat was expected up last evening when the scout was dispatched. Rumor has it that the Yankees are forwarding 1,200 cavalry from Nashville to Savannah, who are hourly expected. This seems to be well authenticated.

My scouts are of the opinion, from intelligence received from the same gentleman mentioned above, that it is the intention of the Yankees as soon as possible to throw a strong scout across the river. They have retained their transports at Savannah, from which I infer that it is their purpose to throw large bodies of troops across the Tennessee, which they can very readily accomplish, as the river is getting within its banks.

General Smith was expected to arrive at Savannah yesterday.

The number of troops at Savannah is pretty well ascertained to be 1,500.

The above information is obtained from my scouts stationed at Chalk Bluff and opposite Savannah.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient, humble servant,

CHARLES BASKERVILLE,

Major, Commanding.

Brig. General DANIEL RUGGLES.