War of the Rebellion: Serial 009 Page 0735 Chapter XXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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has paid every dollar of its war tax, and in which almost every family has sent some member to the battle-fields of Virginia, Tennessee, and Louisiana. The recent bombardment at Corpus Christi proves a determination on the part of the enemy to invade Texas. If injury and annoyance to us be their object, and it can be accomplished by a bombardment of Corpus Christi, surrounded as it is by a desert, how much more terrible would the destruction be here, where the fairest portion of the State lies open and inviting attack. Again permit me to call the attention of the general commanding to our wants upon the coast here. Let him give me an order for a long-range gun or more of those lying in the streets of Houston, and, if to be spared, two 6-pounders and 100 muskets with bayonets, and I indulge the boast that they will be placed in hands that will use them well.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BATES,

Colonel, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS, Velasco, Tex., October 5, 1862.

Lieutenant R. M. FRANKLIN,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Houston, Tex.:

This communication was forwarded direct to San Antonio, and returned, as you see it, without comment. I respectfully submit it for consideration and hope acquiescence of the proper department.

Respectfully,

J. BATES,

Colonel Bates' Regiment.

---- --, 1862.

Respectfully referred to the general commanding. I have here no ordnance to send to Colonel Bates.

X. B. DEBRAY,

Colonel, Commanding Sub-Military District of Houston, Tex.

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Richmond, Va., September 12, 1862.

Brigadier General P. O. HEBERT, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Your proclamation extending martial law over the State of Texas has been laid before the President, and is disapproved by him as an unwarrantable assumption of authority and as containing abuses against even a proper administration of martial law. I am directed by the Secretary of War to inclose herewith a copy of General Orders, Numbers 66, current series, by which your proclamation is annulled.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector-General.

[Inclosure.]

GENERAL ORDERS, ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE, Numbers 66.

Richmond, September 12, 1862.

I. Agreeably to paragraph 1, of General Orders, Numbers 56, current series, declaring that "military commanders have no authority to suspend the