War of the Rebellion: Serial 009 Page 0701 Chapter XXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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Abstract from morning of the First Brigade of Texas Volunteers, commanded by Colonel E. B. Nichols (Galveston, Tex.), February 28, 1862.

Present for duty.

Infantry. Cavalry.

Troops. Officers. Men. Officers. Men.

Kirby's battalion 8 186 .. ...

infantry.

Nelson's regiment 33 603 .. ..

infantry.

Nichols' regiment 41 526 ... ...

infantry.

Oswald's 7 76 ... ...

battalion

infantry.

Spaight's 11 190 .. ...

battalion

infantry.

Debray's mounted ... ... 35 681

battalion.

Cook's artillery. ... ... ... ...

Edgar's light ... .. ... ...

battery.

Grand total. 100 1,581 35 681

Present for duty.

Artillery.

Troops. Officers. Men. Aggregate Aggregate

present. present

and

absent.

Kirby's battalion .. ... 221 250

infantry.

Nelson's regiment .. ... 760 816

infantry.

Nichols' regiment ... .... 803 911

infantry.

Oswald's ... ... 119 143

battalion

infantry.

Spaight's ... ... 292 322

battalion

infantry.

Debray's mounted .... .... 791 879

battalion.

Cook's artillery. 24 347 508 622

Edgar's light 5 58 86 94

battery.

Grand total. 29 405 3,580 4,037

Abstract from field return of Confederate forces on the Lower Rio Grande, commanded by Colonel P. N. Luckett, for February, 1862.

Present for duty.

Troops. Officers. Men. Aggregate Aggregate

present. present

and

absent.

Fort Brown. 38 392 505 557

Ringgold 5 48 62 88

Barracks.

2nd Regiment 13 264 290 313

Texas Mounted

Rifles (three

companies).

Grand total. 56 704 857 958

HDQRS. SUB-MILITARY DIST. OF THE RIO GRANDE,

San Antonio, Tex., March 3, 1862.

Major SAMUEL BOYER DAVIS, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: Since I wrote you respecting the filling up of the mounted regiment I think I have discovered a pretty considerable under-current at work through this country against our cause. It does not occur to me that it can be very strong, yet it may amount in the end to something which will require force to be used. Men have been heard to say, when we (the Confederates) lost a battle, that "We (the Union men) "have gained a victory." Others have sent up small balloons, while others have fired guns by way of rejoicing over these victories. Others are and have been using their utmost exertions to break down the currency of the country, and some others have arms and other supplies for sale, and ask us twice as much for them in our currency as they would in gold or silver, and then refuse to let us have them unless the cash is paid in hand, although assured that they would be paid in sixty days or less. Our friends do not act in this manner, and these men are our enemies. They cannot be reached by civil law, yet they are damaging our cause every day; and if the enemy should land in force on the coast, or invade us on the north (which I think it likely Jim Lane will do in the spring), it will be necessary to take charge of these men in