War of the Rebellion: Serial 009 Page 0673 Chapter XXI. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

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of goods and furniture that they could put to no useful purposes, yet all was taken or wantonly destroyed.

The last thing heard of the Texans they had arrived with about one-half of their original number, in a perfectly disorganized condition, at the Mesilla, on the west side of the river, where they hurriedly crossed it and continued their flight without delay to El Paso, driving before them every quadruped that we upon the borders of the river or in the possession of the inhabitants of that valley. That they suffered intensely by thirst, starvation, and fatigue we have every evidence by those who voluntarily came into Fort Craig seeking succor, and by one or more contrabands who have returned from Mesilla, after leaving accompanied them that far. This is the second invasion our Territory has suffered from Texans, both of which proved equally disastrous, and it is to be hoped will never witness another.

I have the honor to remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY CONNELLY,

Governor of New Mexico.

[Copy furnished War Department by Secretary of State June 9, 1862.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO, Santa Fe, N. Mex., May 18, 1862.

The ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF THE ARMY,

Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to state that since my report of the 10th instant no material changes in the state of affairs in this department have occurred. The Confederate troops are scattered along the Rio Grande from Dona Ana to El Paso, Colonel Steele with 500 men (the re-enforcements that attempted to reach General Sibley about the 20th of March) occupying their most advanced position. They reached the Mesilla with six guns and seven wagons. The remainder of their guns and wagons and the caissons of all their guns were abandoned or destroyed. The command sent out for the purpose of collecting them has not yet returned. The Confederate troops in the Mesilla are now collecting the means necessary to enable them to leave the country, and many of the citizens who had embraced their cause are preparing to leave with them. I have succeeded with some difficulty in getting to Fort Craig a sufficient quantity of subsistence to prevent in getting to among the troops now there,and hope to accumulate within the next twenty days sufficient to warrant a movement below.

Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

ED. R. S. CANBY,

Colonel 19th Inf., and Brigadier General Vols., Commanding Dept.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, May 24, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose for your information an extract

43 R R-VOL IX