War of the Rebellion: Serial 009 Page 0658 OPERATIONS IN TEX., N. MEX., AND ARIZ. Chapter XXI.

Search Civil War Official Records

We have reliable information to-day that General Sibley left Albuquerque five days since for Santa Fe, with 500 men, but at the distance of 20 miles was informed of the approach of Colonel Canby from Fort Craig, and returned to meet him. This I think is reliable, and as Colonel Canby has full 2,000 men with him, there can be no doubt as to his entire rout or capture by Colonel Canby.

From the facts above stated you will see that our Territory will soon be liberated from the further progress of the desolating foe. Our forces here are fully equal to the encounter and dispersion of the enemy we have before us,and Colonel Canby will soon dispose of Sibley and come to our aid, should any be necessary.

I am pleased to be able to give you this flattering account of our affairs, and hope in my next to say that we have not a Texan in arms within our limits.

I have the honor to remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY CONNELLY,

Governor of New Mexico.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO, Fort Craig, N. Mex., March 31, 1862.

The ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF THE ARMY, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose a copy of a communication* from Colonel Slough, of the First Regiment of Colorado Volunteers, reporting an engagement in Apache Canon on the 26th instant, an announcing his intention against the enemy with his entire force. This movement is, in my judgment, premature, and is at variance with my instructions, but as it may involve serious consequences, I have determined to move to-morrow with the force under my immediate command, leaving a garrison of volunteers for this post, and effect a junction with the troops in the northern part of the department. There are two routes by which this junction may be effected: First, by the Abo Pass and Anton Chico; second, by the river to Albuquerque, and thence by San Antonio and Gallisteo. Both of these routes are liable to interruption by an enterprising enemy; but the latter, as the boldest, will be the least suspected, and I shall move directly upon Albuquerque, for the purpose of occupying that place if it can be done without serious loss, and holding it until the junction can be effected,or,if it cannot be,making such demonstration against it as will draw the main force of the Confederates from Santa Fe and enable the columns to unite without opposition. When united, the force under my command will be sufficient to expel the enemy from the country north of this post, but not to follow them into the Mesilla Valley, unless in the mean time re-enforcements from the East sufficient for the occupation of the upper country should arrive. The New Mexican Volunteers cannot be relied on for any purpose of this kind.

Very respectfully, sir,your obedient servant,

ED. R. S. CANBY,

Colonel Nineteenth Infantry, Commanding Department.

---------------

*See Slough's report of March 29, p.533.

---------------