War of the Rebellion: Serial 009 Page 0637 Chapter XXI. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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I send a copy of these letters to General Halleck, Saint Louis, being apprehensive that General Hunter has hone South.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. L. DONALDSON,

Brevet Major, Commanding District of Santa Fe.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SANTA FE,

Santa Fe, March 1, 1862.

General H. W. HALLECK,

Commanding Department of Missouri, Saint Louis:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose a copy of the official report* of battle between the Union troops under Colonel Canby and the Texans, near Fort Craig.

The loss was heavy on both sides, that of the enemy being at least double that of ours.

The enemy have possession of the road above Craig, and may march up, as Colonel Canby is embarrassed with his wounded, as well as having lost McRae's battery.

Everything will be done here to succor him. You will see by my letter to the Adjutant-General of the Army that a regiment of Colorado Volunteers is on the march to this city from Denver and Fort Wise, but the snow is deep on the Taos Mountains and they may not get through in time.

I urgently recommend that four regiments of infantry, some cavalry, and a battery of rifled cannon be at once put en route for Union.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. L. DONALDSON,

Quartermaster, Commanding District of Santa Fe.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,

Santa Fe, March 1, 1862.

SECRETARY OF STATE, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Since my last communication from Fort Craig, I have been unable to write you until this day, in consequence of the commotion and excitement that have existed from that day to the present. On the 19th of February the enemy retrograded from their position, 5 miles below Craig, to the place called Paraje, where they crossed to the opposite or east side of the river. On the 20th he advanced up the river, but at the distance of 4 or 5 miles from it, until about opposite the fort, when Colonel Canby marched out to give him battle. The ground over which the enemy passed, and over which our forces had to pass in order to reach him, was a bed of sand, covered generally with loose volcanic rocks, which impeded the progress of our train of artillery, and made it quite late in the evening before the position of the enemy was reached. This position he had taken with great labor on a sandy height somewhat inaccessible to our heavy artillery. After some fifty or sixty shots fired by the enemy with their largest guns without effect our forces retired again to the fort, arriving some time after dark.

On the 21st the enemy were met 5 miles above the fort, having during the night and the next morning made their way to the river at

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*Canby's report of February 22, p. 487.

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