War of the Rebellion: Serial 009 Page 0580 OPERATIONS IN TEX., MEX., AND ARIZ. Chapter XXI.

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the officer next in rank as soon as practicable, and hold yourself in readiness to repair to the headquarters of the department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GURDEN CHAPIN,

Captain, Seventh U. S. Infantry, Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

[Inclosure O.]

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO, Numbers 153.

Santa Fe, N. Mex., August 26, 1862.

Brigadier General James H. Carleton, U. S. Army, will repair without delay to Santa Fe, for the purpose of relieving Brigadier-General Canby in the command of the Department of New Mexico.

By order of Brigadier-General Canby;

GURDEN CHAPIN,

Captain, Seventh U. S. Infantry, Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

[Inclosure. P.]

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARIZONA, Numbers 17.

Franklin, Tex., August 27, 1862.

* * * * *

II. Captain Roberts' company (E, First California Volunteer Infantry) and Captain Pishon's company (D, First California Volunteer Cavalry) will be ordered by Colonel West to proceed without delay to Franklin, Tex., where Captain Roberts' company will take post, and whence Captain Pishon's company will march to Fort Stockton, in Texas, as a guard to some prisoners of the Confederate Army who are to be sent to Texas on parole.

Each of these companies will be rationed from the depot at Mesilla to include the 30th proximo. Besides these rations Colonel West will send, escorted by Roberts' company, 6,000 rations of subsistence stores from the Mesilla depot to Franklin, Tex.

By order of Brigadier-General Carleton:

BEN. C. CUTLER,

First Lieutenant, First Cal. Vol. Infantry, A. A. A. G.

[Inclosure Q.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF ARIZONA,

Franklin, Tex., September 1, 1862.

COMMANDER OF CONFEDERATE TROOPS, SAN ANTONIO, TEX.:

SIR: I found on my arrival here some 20-odd sick and wounded soldiers of the Confederate States Army, whom I was ordered by General Canby, commanding the Department of New Mexico, to make prisoners of war. These men, at their earnest solicitation, I sent to San Antonio on their parole. They have been furnished with rations of subsistence for forty days and with such medicines and hospital stores as were necessary for them for the road. I have also furnished two wagons for the transportation of those who are unable to walk, and I have sent an escort of 1 lieutenant and 25 rank and file of the First California Volunteer Cavalry to guard them from attack by Mexicans or Indians until a sufficient force from your army is met, to whom they may be transferred, or until they reach some point near San Antonio, where from thence onward they can travel with safety. From that point the lieutenant is ordered to return with his party and all