War of the Rebellion: Serial 009 Page 0559 Chapter XXI. THE CALIFORNIA COLUMN.

Search Civil War Official Records

it can be done without inconvenience to the troops of your own department. I have no paymaster with me, and was not counting on the troops being paid by your paymaster. The men are sadly in want of small stores, tobacco, &c. We have no sutler, and of course, on the desert, the soldiers have exhausted what few necessaries they happened by chance to have.

I have, say, 100 rounds of ammunition for small-arms per man, and can soon have more from Fort Yuma, and I have for the four pieces of artillery the ammunition named in a letter to Lieutenant Shinn, U. S. Third Artillery, marked L. *

The men have only fatigue clothing and that somewhat worn, but I expect some up from Fort Yuma very soon. Can you spare any?

Captain Tredwell Moore, assistant quartermaster, is the only staff officer belonging to the army with me, and he will be relieved from duty in this column shortly after my arrival at Mesilla. I have with me two surgeons, one assistant and one acting assistant surgeon, all of the volunteer service. For the state of my medical supplies, see Surgeon McNulty's letter, marked M.*

The strength of the command when it arrives at Mesilla will be approximately:

Field and staff........................... 25

Say of artillery, aggregate............... 73

On infantry............................... 825

Of cavalry................................ 350

--------

Total fighting force......................1,273

Of employes............................... 127

---------

Total requiring subsistence..............1,400

I will send you an accurate field return as soon as the command under Captain McCleave reaches Mesilla.

I inclose herewith a letter from Major Richard C. Drum, assistant adjutant-general Department of the Pacific, marked N; also a copy of General Orders, Numbers 29 [1862], from the War Department, on the same sheet.

I beg to be fully instructed by you in all measures wherein myself or the California Column can be of the most service. We have not crossed the continent thus far to split hairs, but with an earnest resolution to do out duty whatever be our geographical position; and so the marches of this column tend always toward the heart of the rebellion; the men will forget their toils and sufferings on the Great Desert in their hope ultimately to reach the enemy.

In all this I am sure I but express the sentiments of General Wright.

As the gallantry of the troops under your command has left us nothing to do on the Rio Grande, it would be a sad disappointment to those from California if they should be obliged their steps without feeling the enemy.

I hope I do not ask too much when I inquire whether a force could not profitably be thrown into Western Texas, where it is reported the Union men are only waiting a little help to run up the old flag.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

Brigadier General E. R. S. CANBY, Commanding Dept. of New Mexico.

---------------

* Omitted as of no present importance.

---------------