War of the Rebellion: Serial 009 Page 0552 OPERATIONS IN TEX., N. MEX., AND ARIZ. Chapter XXI.

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Numbers 2. Report of Colonel Gabriel R. Paul, Fourth New Mexico Infantry, commanding district.

HEADQUARTERS SOUTHERN DISTRICT NEW MEXICO,

Fort Craig, N. Mex., May 1, 1862.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I left Fort Union, N. Mex., on the 6th of April, 1862, in command of a column to form a junction with Colonel E. R. S. Canby, who had left Fort Craig on the 31st March, 1862. The junction was made at Tijeras, and our combined forces moved against the enemy, who retreated before us. On the 15th April, at Peralta, we had several skirmishes with the enemy, and during the night he evacuated Peralta and continued his retreat. The pursuit was kept up until our arrival at this post, when from want of provisions we halted; the enemy in a disorganized state, leaving behind him wagons, sick, &c., is making his way out of the Territory. I was left temporarily in the command of this district, with my headquarters at Fort Craig.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. R. PAUL,

Colonel Fourth Regiment New Mexico Vols., Commanding Dist.

The ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY,

Washington, D. C.

Numbers 3. Report of Colonel Benjamin S. Roberts, Fifth New Mexico Infantry, commanding district.

HDQRS. CENTRAL, SANTA FE, AND NORTHERN MIL. DIST.

DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO,

Santa Fe, N. Mex., April 23, 1862.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report myself in command of the Central, Santa Fe, and Northern Military Districts, Department of New Mexico, and that I have established and garrisoned the posts at Albuquerque and Santa Fe, recently occupied by Confederate troops of General Sibley's brigade. It will gratify you to know that the Texan troops are in retreat out of the country, having been compelled by our operations to abandon most of their supplies of all kinds and to take the mountain route behind the Socorro range to avoid the capture of their small remaining force of the 3,000 troops that invaded the Territory. They have abandoned their sick and wounded everywhole everywhere on their line of retreat, and are leaving in a state of demoralization and suffering that has few examples in any war. The long line of their retreat over Jornada and waters of country, without water and that furnish no supplies will render their march extremely difficult and aggravate the ordinary sufferings of a disorganized army under defeat.

The broken-down condition of all our animals, the want of cavalry, and deficiencies of all our supplies will make a successful pursuit equally impracticable, if not impossible.

My reports of the operations of my division in the field from the 1st to the 16th instant will reach you in time through the proper channels.