War of the Rebellion: Serial 009 Page 0429 Chapter XX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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is in full view and about 7 or 8 miles below that point. The atmosphere is so thick that I could not positively determine their number; between fifty and sixty, of which the larger part I think are sailing vessels. Two of the pieces of artillery are already at Ashby's, where it has been for several days; the 6-pounder was moved down to another point this afternoon, and four companies of infantry under a field officer.

The orders contained in your dispatch will of course be carried out. I have to report to you that the available force at my command, exclusive of the detachments on duty at the batteries, is only about 800-808 by last report. The enemy numbers 10,000 men probably. I ask you to send re-enforcements. I forgot to say you are mistaken in supposing I have four pieces of light artillery. The number here is three.

I send this by Lieutenant Cooper.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. SHAW,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORFOLK,

February 8, 1862.

Colonel SHAW,

Eighth Regiment North Carolina Troops:

SIR: Lieutenant A. D. Smith, Company G, First Regiment Wise Legion, arrived 10.30 a. m., crossed at 12.30 from Nag's Head by Gallop's to Powell's Point, and rode all night. He heard the same heavy firing all day. It ceased at night.

Respectfully, yours,

BENJ. HUGER,

Major-General.

NORFOLK, February 9, 1862.

President JEFFERSON DAVIS:

Ammunition was dispatched to Commodore Lynch, who is at Elizabeth City. On the afternoon of the 9th, on meeting the boat stating Roanoke Island was captured, the steamer returned. Commodore Forrest will try and send it by Dismal Swamp Canal, the lower end of which is broken.

I have no news of the enemy. I have ordered troops to move at once and protect the different approaches. Should the enemy attack in front I must be re-enforced.

BENJ. HUGER.

RICHMOND, February 10, 1862.

Major-General HUGER, Norfolk:

Take measures for destroying all supplies at Elizabeth City as soon as satisfied that they cannot be saved from seizure by enemy.

J. P. BENJAMIN,

Secretary of War.

RICHMOND, February 10, 1862.

Brigadier-General GATLIN, Goldsborough:

I am informed there are about 15,000 bales of cotton ready for ship-