War of the Rebellion: Serial 009 Page 0029 Chapter XIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, March 13, 1862.

Hon GIDEON WELLS, Secretary of the Navy:

SIR: I am direction by the Secretary of War to say that he places at your disposal any transports or coal vessels at Fort Monroe for the purpose of closing the channel of the Elizabeth River to prevent the Merrimac again coming out.

I have the honor, &c.,

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

FORT MONROE, VA.,

March 13, 1862-2 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I have just sent the following to Major-General:

Major-General McCLELLAN, Fairfax Court-House:

I have just received dispatch from the President, informing me that you are no longer General-in-Chief of the Army. You command the Army of the Potomac. My orders are hereafter to be received from the Secretary of War. I have urged for months Fort Monroe as a base operations against the army of the rebels at Manassas and the South.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA.,

March 13, 1862-2 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I received last evening a dispatch from the President that Major General McClellan was no longer General-in-Chief of the Army, and that he was assigned to the Army of the Potomac. The Army of the Potomac is not included in my department-the Department of Southeastern Virginia. Since the above telegram I have received the following telegram from Major-General McClellan, viz:

Can I rely on the Monitor to keep the Merrimac in check so that I can make Fort Monroe a base of operations? Please answer at once.

I have answered that he could rely on the Monitor; but if he makes Fort Monroe the base of operations-which should have been done months ago-I will rank him, and must command, for I am now in command by the President according to my brevet rank. Please to answer.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA.,

March 13, 1862-3.5 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

In reply to Major-General McClellan's desire to know what I wanted for defense of my position, I replied, for immediate defense, as follows, viz: Two thousand regular infantry and 8,000 volunteer infantry; five batteries of light artillery (regulars, if possible); 1,100 horses for the five batteries, to complete the batteries I have here and to mount Dodge's