War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0828 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter XVIII.

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I hear of more rebel organizations in the vicinity of Lexington; if so, break them up.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, February 2, 1862.

Major General D. HUNTER,

Commanding Department of Kansas, Fort Leavenworth:

GENERAL: Yours of the 28th is received. I presume that are this the First Kansas Infantry have reported to you, as they left Lexington some time since. After the orders was issued it was ascertained that the detachment called "Kansas Rangers" was not composed of Kansas troops, and the order respecting it was revoked.

Your General Orders, Numbers 12, are just received. I am delighted with them. The only way to keep peace between the Kansians and Missourians is to keep them apart. We have numerous old grudges to settle. I have directed my adjutant-general to send you a full file of my general orders, and I would be pleased if you can reciprocate.

The expedition against Price moves very slowly, the roads being horrible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, February 2, 1862.

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN,

Washington:

GENERAL: I inclose herewith extracts from General Sigel's letters, published in the German papers and translated. The German papers here are filled with anonymous attacks on the Government at Washington and on my administration here, coming, as it is well ascertained, from the German officers under General Sigel's command. They have also held a number of secret meetings in this city for the purpose of organizing a meeting among the foreign troops and an insurrection of the German population. I have succeeded in introducing police officers into some of these meetings, and their reports are conclusive as to the existence of this plot. I send you a copy of a report of a captain of police, who was present at a meeting of this kind on the 26th ultimo. I would remark that most of the officers named were here without my knowledge and contrary to my positive orders. Being ordered to move from Rolla toward Springfield, they left their regiments and came here to stir up mutiny and insurrection. Several of them belong to Sigel's immediate command.

General Sigel's name is put forward first, but he is an instrument rather than the head of these revolutionists. Letters and papers which have fallen into my hands prove that the instigators of this movement are the emissaries of leading politicians of the Fremont party, and it is expected that the result will, be means of the newspaper press, be made to inure to his benefit as against the present administration. The plan, as discussed at one of these secret meetings, was to force the Presidents to make Sigel a major-general, which would make him second in command in this department. He would then claim all the German regiments