War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0823 Chapter XVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Articles of War," which are statutory provisions, modifying the laws of war only in the particular cases these provisions apply. In all cases not embraced in this statutory law, and not made triable by the courts which it create, we must recur to the general code of war and try by a military commission.

A military commission will be immediately ordered to assemble at La Mine Cantonment for the trial of such prisoners as may be brought before it. You will furnish the judge-advocate with a copy of this letter for his guidance, and will see that the charges and specifications are properly drawn up.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, December 31, 1861.

Brigadier-General SCHOFIELD,

Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: I inclose a memorandum of information* received here respecting the principal persons who originated or encouraged the arsons committed on the North Missouri Railroad, and also a communication from Mr. Clay Taylor, whom you will observe is one of the parties accused, although he has not aware of that fact when he wrote. It is believed here that there is pretty good foundation for these charges. I wish you to get all the information subject you can, and, if you deem the evidence sufficient to justify, it to arrest the parties. Do not let the contents of the memorandum be made public. If General Prentiss has taken the command of your forces you will, of course, report this letter to him. I also wish the matter of Mr. Clay Taylor's complaint to be investigated, and if injustice has been done him it must be repaired. I have had no information from you or General Prentiss for several days. Why is this?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

+ WASHINGTON CITY, January 3, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK;

GENERAL: I have some anxiety in regard to your Orders, Numbers 24, making the friends of the enemy contribute to the support of the refugees from the Southwest.

I have regarded that order as eminently wise and proper, and desired to see it carried out with vigor. Recently it was intimated from Saint Louis than an effort was being made by some of our Union friends in Saint Louis to induce you to relax the order, if not to recall it entirely, and this report gave me great concern. I apprehended that efforts had been made to obtain the interposition of the President, and therefore I determined to see him in regard to the matter. He told me to tell you "that he had not given the subject much consideration, but that he

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* Not found. + For reply, see p. 490.

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