War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0741 Chapter XVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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it shall be made be duly enrolled in his brigade or battalion. Any officer who shall presume to disobey this order will be held to a strict accountability.

VIII. The quartermaster, commissary, and ordnance officer of the First Brigade will each take an exact inventory of all the public property within the brigade belonging to his department; and after obtaining therefor the proper receipts (in the form required by the Regulations for the Government of the Armies of the Confederate States) from the officers to whom the same has been delivered, he will receipt in due form to the Quartermaster-General and Commissary General of the State for such property.

IX. No discharge will be hereafter granted to any soldier of the State Guard upon the ground of "re-enlistment for twelve months or longer," unless he shall bring a certificate from the adjutant of one of the brigades or of the extra battalion that he has been duly enrolled in such brigade or battalion.

X. The Confederate Government will not accept any additional companies of cavalry unless they enlist for the war.

By order of Major General S. Price:

WM. H. BRAND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

FAYETTEVILLE, ARK., January 24, 1862.

Major General STERLING PRICE,

Commanding Mo. S. G., Springfield, Mo.:

GENERAL: By instruction from division headquarters I transmit to you a telegram from the colonel commanding. I will use all efforts to be ready to assist you whenever called upon. I am pleased that the colonel commanding division authorizes me to move my force when you give me information of the enemy that will warrant me to advance. No news from below beyond what is given in the telegram.

In haste, I remain, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

LOUIS HEBERT,

Colonel Third Regiment La. Vols., Commanding Brigade.

[Inclosure.]

FORT SMITH,

January 24, 1862 (via Fayetteville).

General PRICE:

I have ordered Colonel Hebert to put his brigade in immediate preparation to move forward on your call. If the troops now at Rolla intend an advance at once I suppose you will be able to ascertain the fact, and you can at once on Colonel Hebert, who will move to your assistance. The troops now at Fayetteville under Colonel Hebert, nearly 4,000, can reach Springfield as soon as those from Rolla can do so.

You do not inform me of the strength or condition of your command. I should know both, in order to justify me in the responsibility of taking this step. I will at once order some of the regiments from Texas to the point in anticipation of active operations in Missouri.

I am now engaged in carrying into effect important orders received from the headquarters of the Army; but if you are in danger I will be with you with the advance of our troops. I hope you will use your utmost endeavors to have all the flour prepared you can.