War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0713 Chapter XVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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would give me greater pleasure than to march to the aid of men so gallantly battling for their country and their homes.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES McINTOSH,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DIVISION,

Van Buren, Ark., December 14, 1861.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that I have just received the inclosed communication* from Colonel Cooper, commanding the forces in the Indian Department. In answer to his call for aid I have sent seven companies of Young's regiment, five companies of Greer's regiment, and Major Whitfield's battalion of three companies. I have also countermanded the order calling Sims' regiment into winter quarters, and ordered him to report to Colonel Cooper. With this force I think Colonel Cooper will be able to march against Hopoeithlayohola with a certainty of success. I have advised him as soon as this force is concentrated to march at once and use his utmost efforts to destroy the enemy. Hopoeithlayohola has now 2,500 men, and probably more will join him unless he is soon overthrown. Drew's regiment of Cherokees has disbanded, the greater number going over to the enemy. Hopoeithlayohola is undoubtedly securing assistance from Kansas.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES McINTOSH,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS OF DIVISION,

Van Buren, Ark., December 15, 1861.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant-General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to apply to be removed from this section of the country after the return of General McCulloch, or, if he does not return, after I am relieved from the command of this division. In the mean time I will use every possible means to organize the different departments of the division and to render the troops as efficient as the circumstances will permit. It is well known to you that as soon as I resigned from the Federal service I hastened to Montgomery, and laid before the Department the necessity of organizing a force to operate here, and I volunteered for service. I had hoped that a position would have been assigned me, giving me some command, but, notwithstanding my disappointment, I cheerfully came out as the adjutant-general of the officer assigned to duty here, and labored faithfully and under many difficulties to form an army. During the period I acted as adjutant-general the command of several different regiments was offered to me. At length I accepted one, and led it through the bloody field

*See of December 11, p. 709.