War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0705 Chapter XVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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men sick and they are dying by the wholesale. Please send me some orders on the subject of reorganization.

Yours, most respectfully,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. FIRST MIL. DIST., MISSOURI STATE GUARD,

New Madrid, Mo., December 8, 1861-10 a. m.

Major General LEONIDAS POLK, C. S. A., Columbus, Ky.:

DEAR GENERAL: My dispatches inform me that two of my men, who were sent to take posts on my courier line, have been captured by the enemy. Major Kalfus has sent to you a plan and description of the works at Cairo, and I am fearful they were sent by these two men, and I notify you, for fear that other plans may be sent you in lieu of those captured. I will immediately write to Major Kalfus to get the names of persons bearing his dispatch to you. Our fort is nearly ready.

Yours, most respectfully,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. FIRST MIL. DIST., MISSOURI STATE GUARD,

New Madrid, Mo., December 9, 1861.

Colonel W. G. PHEELAN, MO. S. G.,

Camp Blanton, Mo.:

DEAR COLONEL: Governor Jackson is here, and I can now begin to talk with some knowledge of the plan of reorganization. It is proposed that all the able-bodied men shall enlist in the Confederate service, and from among themselves elect their field officers up to the colonel. The balance are to form themselves into new companies and regiments of Missouri State Guard under the old law, subject to be called out at any time the Governor may see fit. Now, I want you to tell me frankly and fairly how many we can depend upon from Stoddard County. It is very necessary that we should form a whole brigade, if possible, and, as the companies and regiments must be full, I am very anxious to know what to rely upon. If it would assist in the organization, or you think more would be induced to join, I will order all your command over to this post, so that you all can have a show in the election of field officers; for, if you remain on that side of the swamp, you can only form companies and then will have to be attached to some other regiment, where the officers may be already elected. Probably it would be as well to form companies over there, and then let them march here before the election of field officers. This applies to the cavalry as well as to the infantry, and I really am in doubt as to the best plan to give you all a fair show and satisfaction. If Bloomfield could be left exposed for a week, without danger from the enemy, I would at once order over all, to be paid off and reorganize. Therefore, I simply repeat, let me know your opinion on the subject as soon as possible, as there is not much time to lose.

M. JEFF. THOMPSON

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

45 R R-VOL VIII.