War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0704 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter XVIII.

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they determined to disband. The officers all seemed willing and anxious, and I, feeling willing or disposed to hold them against their desire when we were all about reorganizing, gave my consent, and yesterday they scattered to the four winds. Kelly, Peterson, Wise, and Brannon remain with me. Some went. Frost and Bower and the majority have returned to Saint Louis County. The terms of enlistment of my men are expiring each day, and, as we have not been able to get a single official order or instruction as to the plan of reorganization, I am having great trouble ta satisfy the men. If you can throw any light upon the subject I will be much obliged to you.

Believe me to be, yours, most respectfully,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. FIRST MIL. DIST., MISSOURI STATE GUARD,

New Madrid, Mo., December 7, 1861.

Brigadier General GIDEON J. PILLOW, C. S. S., Columbus, Ky.:

DEAR GENERAL: Colonel Gantt reached here last night, and is now encamping near the fort. I will have the big guns placed to-day. I am anxiously awaiting the arrival of Governor Jackson or definite instructions about four reorganization. The terms of enlistment of my men are expiring every day, and while there is so much suspense many are desiring to leave who would cheerfully enlist if matters could be placed right. The rumor that General Price has been superseded is producing great dissatisfaction and I hope the report is untrue. A number of outsiders have been here recruiting and my officers have been much annoyed. Everything is reported quiet about Charleston. I hope my men are reporting to your satisfaction.

Yours, respectfully,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. FIRST MIL. DIST., MISSOURI STATE GUARD,

New Madrid, Mo., December 8, 1861,

His Excellency C. F. JACKSON,

Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Missouri, Richmond, Mo.:

SIR: I have been most anxiously waiting some definite instructions in regard to the expiration of the terms of enlistment of the men now in the field of the Missouri State Guard, and also about our organization under the Confederate States. The time of those who answered your call is fast expiring. In fact every day whole companies are relieved by expiration of terms, and as many should and ought to go home, while others would come under different officers, the present efficiency of the force is decidedly below par. If the present organization is to be continued in the field another proclamation from you is necessary, and, if a reorganization is to be had or gone into, it should be done soon and all at once, so that the appeals and excitement can be used to better advantage. I can raise a brigade without any trouble, if allowed to manage it now; but if separate companies and regiments are allowed to break up and form at different times, there will be no enthusiasm and a great falling off in numbers. I have a great many