War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0613 Chapter XVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS MISSISSIPPI DISTRICT,

Near New Madrid, March 14, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

To my utter amazement the enemy hurriedly evacuated the place last night, leaving everything. They were landed in the woods opposite and dispersed. Thy have been landing troops here ever since we arrived, and I am sure almost that they have withdrawn all their troops from Island Numbers 10. I can send you the cavalry for Steele, but would prefer to send other regiments. Please inform me as to your wishes about my further operations. I shall reconnoiter island Numbers 10 to-day.

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General.

CAIRO, March 14, 1862.

Major General JOHN POPE, New Madrid:

I congratulate you and your command on the success which has crowned your toils and exposures. You have given the final blow to the rebellion in Missouri and proved yourselves worthy members of the brave Army of the West.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

NEW MADRID, March 14, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

New Madrid is in our possession. Our lines were drawn closely around the works all day yesterday under furious cannonading from nine gunboats and from heavy batteries on land. Last night the place was hurriedly evacuated under cover of the furious storm which raged all night. All of their artillery (field batteries and siege guns), an immense quantity of military stores, all their tents, wagons, mules, &c., have fallen into our hands. The enemy carried off nothing except his men, who were landed immediately opposite on the wide bottom and dispersed. Hamilton's division is now entering this place.

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS MISSISSIPPI DISTRICT,

New Madrid, March 14, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Our success has been even greater than I reported. Twenty-five pieces of heavy artillery, 24-pounders and rifled 32s, two batteries of field artillery, an immense quantity of mixed ammunition, several thousand stand of small-arms, with hundreds of boxes of musket cartridges, 300 mules and horses, tents for an army of 12,000 men, and an immense quantity of other valuable property of not less value than a million of dollars, have fallen into our hands. The men only escaped, but the enemy's whole force is demoralized and dispersed in the swamp on the opposite side of the river. The enemy abandoned the works so hurriedly as to leave all the baggage of officers and knapsacks of men, their dead unburied, their suppers on the tables, and the candles burning in