War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0565 Chapter XVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Brigadier General John M. Palmer is assigned to the command of this division, the Second Brigade of which will be hereafter designated.

The brigade under General Slack will prepare to move forward to the town of Benton to-morrow morning. Captain J. A. Swain, assistant quartermaster, has been instructed to make up the transportation of this brigade for temporary purposes to 50 wagons. Such baggage and supplies as are needed for immediate use will be transported with the brigade; the remainder of its baggage and supplies will be forwarded to Benton after the brigade is in position at that place.

Each commander of a regiment will detail a commissioned officer, with a sufficient guard, to remain behind in charge of the regimental baggage and supplies which cannot be transported with the brigade. At least three days' rations will be carried with the brigade.

The brigade commander will establish his command in camp in the neighborhood of the town of Benton, and will be held strictly accountable to these headquarters that his force is in camp, his grand guards, pickets, outposts, and police guards are mounted strictly in accordance with Army Regulations; that his forces discharge their duties in all respects according to miliary requirements; that proper vigilance is observed, and all the usual precautions common to a force in presence of an enemy are carefully and closely attended to.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 24, 1862.

Brigadier General G. W. CULLUM,

Cairo, Ill.:

Send troops to General Pope till his command amounts to 10,000, the infantry, artillery, and cavalry being in due proportion. I cannot ascertain what he has got what he is doing. Why don't he report by Cape Girardeau?

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

COMMERCE, MO., February 24, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

There are now here nine regiments of infantry, one battery Eleventh Ohio, and six companies of the First U. S. Infantry, about 6,500 men.

In accordance with my understanding with General Cullum am stopping every boat coming down the river and unloading the troops. No cavalry yet here.

I occupied Benton to-day with one brigade the troops as fast as they arrive and establish them by divisions at points here and Benton.

If all troops designed for this command can be thrown here in there days I could march on 7th. They come in slowly. I took off six companies of the First Infantry from the Meteor and Sunshine.

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.