War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0563 Chapter XVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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force, proceed as far as Fayetteville and take that place; but you will avoid any serious engagement with the enemy. You will, in taking the town, try to get position on high commanding ground, and send in a judicious officer ot reconnoiter the premises and take and bring away flags, arms, and other military articles if occasion offers.

You will not allow private houses to be entered unless it may be previously ascertained or reasonably believed arms, spies, or force be concealed within. If you can find any of the leading citizens ask one or two of them to come with you, as it is my earnest desire to prevent damage to private property. You will especially place a guard over the printing-office while our troops are there, and inform the owners, if they can be found, that I desire the use of the press to publish orders, which are intended to prevent my troops from doing mischief.

Restrain your troops from acts of cruelty and folly, and avoid surprise or ambuscade. If you hear of suitable roads, make a detour to the right sand return to these headquarters at your earliest convenience.

I am, general, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 22, 1862.

Brigadier General SAMUEL R. CURTIS,

Commanding Army of Southwest, Arkansas:

You will not advance any troops farther south than Fayetteville. Occupy with artillery and infantry one or more of the most important passes. The main force should encamp at Bentonville or some point in supporting distance of the passes occupied, which passes should be well secured by intrenchments, abatis, &c. The advanced post, say Fayetteville, should be occupied with cavalry and some light artillery, which can move with it. Notify me promptly of your proposed dis positions. I will soon turn Prince and relieve you of his presence.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Numbers 46.

Saint Louis, Mo., February 22, 1862.

I. The major-general commanding the department desires to impress upon all officers the importance of preserving good order and discipline among their troops as the armies of the West advance into Tennessee and other Southern States. Let us show to our fellow-citizens of these States theat we come merely to crush out rebellion and to restore to them peace and the benefits of the Constitution and the Union, of which they have been deprived by selfish and unprincipled leaders. They have been told that we come to oppress and to plunder. By our acts we will undeceive them. We will prove to them that we come to restore, not to violate, the Constitution and laws. In restoring to them the glorious flag of the Union we will assure them that they shall enjoy under its folds the same protection of life and property as in former days. Soldiers, let no excesses on your part tarnish the glory of our arms.