War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0513 Chapter XVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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and myself have done our best to bring about better results, but our wants are not supplied or even noticed.

Respectfully, your friend, in haste,

A. S. BAXTER,

Assistant Quartermaster.

[Indorsements.]

JANUARY 25, 1862.

Respectfully referred to Major-General McClellan for his perusal. Unless the quartermaster's department here is furnished with funds soon it will be impossible to organize the expedition from Cairo. These letters show the condition of affairs not only at Cairo but throughout the department.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

JANUARY 30, 1862.

Respectfully referred to the honorable Secretary of War for his information.

I know the fact that in the spring (April and May) there was a great deficiency of funds at Cairo. The public interests require as prompt action as possible in this case.

GEO. B. McCLELLAN,

Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

SAINT LOUIS, January 22, 1862.

Major General GEORGE B. McCLELLAN:

No complete returns for December have been received. Whole number in department will probably amount to 105,000 on paper. Several irregular corps have been mustered out since 1st instant. More will be as soon as money is received to pay them. Large percentage now sick.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

ROLLA, January 22, 1862.

Captain J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: On the receipt of the general's letter of the 18th, giving me further assurances of ability and determination to push this column through, I immediately ordered Colonels Carr and Osterhaus to move forward to Lebanon, and ordered other troops to Waynesville to guard my stores there and support the Lebanon position. The Lebanon depot will now be the main one, and I shall follow the general's order to receive supplies peaceably, if I can; forcibly, if I must. The only thing I fear in regard to the troops coming from Tipton is delay, but this I suppose is unavoidable. The opinion here is that the route by Linnville is most certain of success. I shall be anxious to know when they start and how they progress and who commands. Supplies being the main question in moving armies in America, especially in a sparsely settled portion, my main efforts are devoted to that matter, and my

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