War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0511 Chapter XVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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These suggestions are hastily written out, but they are the result of much anxious inquiry and mature deliberation. I am confident that the plan, if properly carried out, would produce important results. I also believe it to be feasible.

I have not designated any particular line or lines of movement. That must be a matter of further study if the general idea should be approved. Perhaps the main column should move from Smithland, between the rivers, by Dover, &c. Perhaps the line east of the Cumberland or that west of the Tennessee would be preferable. These questions, however, are matters easily determinable.

I have been sick for more than a week with the measles, and several members of my staff are unable to attend to an duty. Under these circumstances some delay must occur in answering the communication from the Adjutant-General of the Army.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, January 21, 1862.

Brigadier General SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding, &c., Rolla:

GENERAL: Yours of the 19th is received.* I have already informed you that the Ninth Iowa and a division from General Pope's command have been ordered to report to you. This will make your force over 15,000 men. Should the Benton Hussars and the Forty-third Illinois be prepared in time for the field they may be sent to your command. If not, they must go elsewhere. The Second Iowa cannot be relieved before the last of next week, and it is still uncertain when the Curtis Horse will be ready for the field. We have neither horses nor arms for them at present. Brigades and divisions must be made up according to the circumstances of the particular case and the exigencies of the service. If I were to attempt to gratify the wishes of particular commands I should be obliged to transfer half the troops in this department at an enormous expense, at a time when the Quartermaster's Department has not a single cent to pay necessary expenses. It cannot be done and will not be attempted. I doubt very much whether I can send you any more artillery than that taken by the division from Sedalia. If possible I will send you Mann's or Spoor's, as I best can. I find it utterly impossible to unite fragments of regiments so as to satisfy either men or officers and Governors of States.

I must call your attention to certain irregularities. Your dissolution of the general court-martial was contrary to law. When the officers composing the court are ordered into the field the court ceases to act as such, but it cannot be dissolved or the prisoners released except by the authority ordering it.

Again, your Special Orders, Numbers 41, ordering men from General Sherman's command, is entirely irregular. You can give any orders to troops at Benton Barracks. You should have made a requisition on me for the corporal and men wanted. These may appear small matters, but they create difficulties and annoyances which it takes much of my time to arrange. It is just as easy to follow the law and regulations as it is to violate them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

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*Not found.

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