War of the Rebellion: Serial 008 Page 0480 OPERATIONS IN MO., ARK., KANS., AND IND. T. Chapter XVIII.

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road is repaired and inform you be telegraph, so that you can have men there to receive it.

I inclose copies of General Orders, Nos. 2 and 3. Numbers 2 is intended chiefly for my German cavalry, but will of course be applied to any case that comes within its terms.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

ROLLA, January 2, 1862.

Captain J. C. KELTON:

My cavalry arrived Tuesday night, as I said, 52 miles from Springfield, 15 miles south of Lebanon. Two hundred and fifty rebels reported in Lebanon. A company 6 miles southeast collecting pork; another 4 miles southwest reported. Four thousand in Springfield. Will attack camps about Lebanon. Will concentrate cavalry there. All right here.

SAML. R. CURTIS.

ROLLA, January 2, 1862.

Captain J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Rebels fled from Lebanon before our cavalry arrived. The forage camp southwest from Colonel Carr was routed from breakfast. The rebels were pursued miles. Some of them will never return. Four prisoners and a lot of cattle and sheep them.

SAML. R. CURTIS,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT,

Rolla, January 2, 1862.

Captain J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have telegraphed the substance of news from my cavalry, which halted 52 miles this side of Springfield. Before receiving that news I had ordered the four cavalry companies from Salem to Lebanon, and also two more companies from this place, to support the rear of Carr's command, and drive out the rebels, who I heard had returned to Lebanon and Monday. Colonel Carr's news of 40,000 at Springfield was received from Lebanon. There was also a report that 500 more rebel cavalry was hourly expected at Lebanon. Consequently Colonel Carr halted and sent five of his companies to Lebanon. You understand Carr's command passed east of Lebanon. You understand dispatches saw no force, and the 40,000 at Springfield is of course an exaggeration, but all accounts concur in the opinion that Price has been considerably re-enforced.

The general's dispatch directing me to prepare to march was duly received. I have had quartermasters and commissaries waiting night and day, but how this matter stands is not yet ascertained. The country is generally a rough, unsettled wilderness, every road a defile, and supply

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*Not found.

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